Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To move about in a quick, uneasy way; be constantly in motion.
  • v. To give trouble to; vex; perplex.
  • n. Restlessness or agitation caused by trifling annoyance.
  • n. Any trifling peculiarity in regard to work which causes unnecessary trouble; teasing exactness of operation.
  • n. A fig.
  • n. A sore place on the foot.
  • v. To feign; dissemble; flatter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See fyke.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To feign; dissemble; flatter.
  • To move about in a quick, uneasy way; be constantly in motion; be restless; fidget; be nervous.
  • To hurry away.
  • To give trouble to; vex; perplex.
  • n. Restlessness or agitation caused by trifling annoyance.
  • n. Any trifling peculiarity in regard to work which causes unnecessary trouble; teasing exactness of operation.
  • n. A fig.
  • n. A sore place on the foot.

Etymologies

From Middle English fiken ("to feign, dissemble, flatter"), from Old English fician ("to wheedle, flatter") (also found in compound befician ("to deceive")), from Proto-Germanic *fikōnan (“to deceive”), from Proto-Indo-European *pÁig-, *peig- (“ill-meaning, evil-minded, treacherous, hostile, bad”). Related to Old English ġefic ("fraud, deceit, deception"), Old English fācen ("deceit, fraud, treachery, sin, evil, crime, blemish, fault"), Middle High German veichen ("dissembling, deceit, fraud"), Latin piget ("it irks, it annoys"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English fiken, fyken ("to fidget, move about restlessly, hasten away"), from Old Norse fíkjast ("to be eager or restless"), from fíka ("to climb, move"). Cognate with Scots fyke ("to move about restlessly, fidget, itch"), Norwegian fika ("to strive, take trouble"), Icelandic fikinn ("eager, greedy"). Related to fig and fidget. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English fike, from Old English fīc ("fig, fig-tree, fig-disease, venereal ulcer, hemorrhoids"), from Proto-Germanic *fika, *figa (“fig”), from Latin fīca, fīcus ("fig, fig-tree"). Cognate with Dutch vijg ("fig"), German Feige ("fig"), Swedish fikon ("fig"), Icelandic fikja ("ficus"). More at fig. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I love these three from the Century:

    n. Any trifling peculiarity in regard to work which causes unnecessary trouble; teasing exactness of operation.

    n. A fig.

    n. A sore place on the foot.

    March 23, 2012