Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adv. At frequent intervals; often.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. At frequent intervals.
  • adv. for infinitely many terms of the sequence

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adv. At frequent or short intervals; many times; often; repeatedly; commonly.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Populously; in a crowded manner.
  • Often; many times; at short intervals.
  • Synonyms See often.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adv. many times at short intervals

Etymologies

frequent +‎ -ly (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The windows of a nursery ought not only to be frequently opened to let in fresh air, but should be _frequently cleaned_, to let in plenty of light and of sunshine, as nothing is so cheering and beneficial to a child as an abundance of light and sunshine!

    Advice to a Mother on the Management of Her Children

  • Even worse, the kiss of academic death, some get called “slow learners,” a term frequently deployed to write a kid off as having “low potential.”

    A Mind at a Time

  • Cooper used the term frequently to describe Mubarak's regime.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • "Price tag" attack is a term frequently used by radical Israeli settlers to denote reprisal attacks against Palestinians in response to moves by the Israeli government to evacuate illegal West Bank outposts.

    CNN.com

  • "Mashallah" is a word frequently heard used between Muslims.

    Engy Abdelkader: A Few Good Muslim Men -- Honoring Those Who Honor Women

  • Perry Sherlund also discovered "Snowpocalypse" - the name frequently used to described the heavy snowstorm of December 18-19, 2009 - made the list.

    Snowmageddon makes "new words and slang" list

  • He deconstructs one particular account which has the crowd saying, "His blood be on us and on our children" — a phrase frequently cited as evidence of the collective guilt Jews bore and the curse that they carried as a result.

    Pope: Jews not to blame for Jesus' death

  • The fact that the Frankfurt School mounted a strong critique of positivism is quite well known, in part because of the so-called “Positivismusstreit” of the 1960s, and Horkheimer also uses the term frequently, especially in his later works.

    Max Horkheimer

  • I presume he uses the term frequently enough that his loyal viewers won't become confused and angrily picket next year's ESPY awards.

    Eric Williams: Right Like Me

  • I had seen the term frequently, but I could not pin it down, nor could I fairly identify a list of books that fit the bill.

    Biography: A User's Guide by Carl Rollyson

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