Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A landed estate.
  • n. The main house on an estate; a mansion.
  • n. A tract of land in certain North American colonies with hereditary rights granted to the proprietor by royal charter.
  • n. The district over which a lord had domain and could exercise certain rights and privileges in medieval western Europe.
  • n. The lord's residence in such a district.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A landed estate.
  • n. The main house of such an estate or a similar residence; a mansion.
  • n. A district over which a feudal lord could exercise certain rights and privileges in medieval western Europe.
  • n. The lord's residence and seat of control in such a district.
  • n. One's neighbourhood.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The land belonging to a lord or nobleman, or so much land as a lord or great personage kept in his own hands, for the use and subsistence of his family.
  • n. A tract of land occupied by tenants who pay a free-farm rent to the proprietor, sometimes in kind, and sometimes by performing certain stipulated services.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. 1. A dwelling; habitation.
  • n. In England, generally, a landed estate, especially one the tenure of which vests the proprietor with some particular rights of lordship; specifically, in old law, a lordship or barony held by a lord and subject to the jurisdiction of a court-baron held by him; in more ancient usage, an estate of a lord or thane with a village community, generally in serfdom, upon it. See villeinage and yard-land.
  • n. The jurisdiction of a court-baron or court of the lord of a manor.
  • n. In some of the United States formed by English colonies, a tract of land occupied or once occupied by tenants paying a fee-farm rent to the proprietor, sometimes in kind, and sometimes in stipulated services. Burrill.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the mansion of a lord or wealthy person
  • n. the landed estate of a lord (including the house on it)

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French maneir, manoir, to dwell, manor, from Latin manēre, to remain; see men-3 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French manoir. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • JM knows a man's home is his castle, in a manor of speaking.

    May 25, 2011