Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A way of doing something or the way in which a thing is done or happens. See Synonyms at method.
  • n. A way of acting; bearing or behavior.
  • n. The socially correct way of acting; etiquette.
  • n. The prevailing customs, social conduct, and norms of a specific society, period, or group, especially as the subject of a literary work.
  • n. Practice, style, execution, or method in the arts: This fresco is typical of the painter's early manner.
  • n. Kind; sort: What manner of person is she?
  • n. Kinds; sorts: saw all manner of people at the mall.
  • idiom in a manner of speaking In a way; so to speak.
  • idiom to the manner born Accustomed to a position, custom, or lifestyle from or as if from birth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Mode of action; way of performing or effecting anything; method; style; form; fashion.
  • n. Characteristic mode of acting, conducting, carrying one's self; bearing; habitual style.
  • n. Customary method of acting; habit.
  • n. Carriage; behavior; deportment; also, becoming behavior; well-bred carriage and address.
  • n. The style of writing or thought of an author; characteristic peculiarity of an artist.
  • n. Certain degree or measure; as, it is in a manner done already.
  • n. Sort; kind; style
  • n. standards of conduct cultured and product of mind.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Mode of action; way of performing or effecting anything; method; style; form; fashion.
  • n. Characteristic mode of acting, conducting, carrying one's self, or the like; bearing; habitual style.
  • n. Customary method of acting; habit.
  • n. Carriage; behavior; deportment; also, becoming behavior; well-bred carriage and address.
  • n. The style of writing or thought of an author; characteristic peculiarity of an artist.
  • n. Certain degree or measure.
  • n. Sort; kind; style; -- in this application sometimes having the sense of a plural, sorts or kinds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The way in which an action is performed; method of doing anything; mode of proceeding in any case or situation; mode; way; method.
  • n. Habitual practice; customary mode of acting or proceeding with respect to anything; characteristic way or style, as in art or literature; distinctive method; habit; style: as, one's manner of life; the manner of Titian, or of Dickens.
  • n. Personal bearing or behavior; customary conduct; characteristic way of acting; wonted deportment or demeanor: most commonly in the plural: as, his manner was abrupt; good or bad manners; reformation of manners in a community.
  • n. Specifically plural Good behavior; polite deportment; habitual practice of civility; commendable habits of conduct: as, have you no manners?
  • n. The way in which anything is made or constituted; mode of being or formation; fashion; character; sort; kind: often used with all in a plural sense, equivalent to sorts or kinds: as, all manner of baked meats.
  • n. [The word in this sense is frequently used in old English without of following, in a quasi-adjective use, like kind of in modern English: as, manner folk, kind of people; manner crime, kind of crime, etc.
  • n. [Manner here is sometimes understood as manor (which was formerly also spelled manner), and is often changed to manor in the quotation to make the phrase applicable to locality.] Synonyms Manner, Mode, Method, Way. Manner is the least precise of these words, standing for sort or kind, custom, mode, method, or the like. Mode may mean a fashion, or a form or sort, as a mode of existence, or a single act or an established way, as a mode of disposing of refuse. Method implies a succession of acts tending to an end, as a method of slaughtering an ox or of solving a problem. Way is a very general word, in large popular use for each of the others, as a man's way of building a dam (method), of holding a pen (mode), of staring at strangers (manner).
  • n. Habit, Usage, etc. See custom.
  • n. Manners, Morals, etc. See morality.
  • n. An obsolete form of manor.
  • n. Another form of mainor.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. how something is done or how it happens
  • n. a kind
  • n. a way of acting or behaving

Etymologies

Middle English manere, from Old French maniere, from feminine of manier, handmade, skillful, from Vulgar Latin *manuārius, convenient, handy, from Latin, of the hand, from manus, hand; see man-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Anglo-Norman manere, from Old French maniere, from Vulgar Latin *manaria, from feminine of Latin manuarius ("belonging to the hand"), from manus ("hand") (Wiktionary)

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