Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. One's relatives; family; kinfolk.
  • n. A kinsman or kinswoman.
  • adj. Related; akin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Race; family; breed; kind.
  • n. Persons of the same race or family; kindred.
  • n. One or more relatives, such as siblings or cousins, taken collectively.
  • n. Relationship; same-bloodedness or affinity; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent.
  • n. Kind; sort; manner; way.
  • adj. Related by blood or marriage, akin. Generally used in "kin to".

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The unit velocity in the C. G. S. system -- a velocity of one centimeter per second.
  • adj. Of the same nature or kind; kinder.
  • n. A primitive Chinese instrument of the cittern kind, with from five to twenty-five silken strings.
  • n. Relationship, consanguinity, or affinity; connection by birth or marriage; kindred; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent.
  • n. Relatives; persons of the same family or race.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of kin; of the same blood; related.
  • Of the same kind or nature; having affinity.
  • n. Race; family; breed; kind.
  • n. Collectively, persons of the same race or family; kindred.
  • n. Relationship; consanguinity or affinity; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent.
  • n. Kind; sort; manner; way.
  • n. A person's nearest relatives according to the civil law. (Stimson.) The phrase does not include a widow, she being specifically provided for by the law as widow, and it is sometimes used in contradistinction to children: as, the widow, children, and next of kin. In either use it means that one (or more) who stands in the nearest degree of blood-relationship to the deceased. What degree is deemed nearest varies somewhat in the details of the law of different jurisdictions; but in general where there are no children, or descendants of children, the father is the next of kin, and if there is no father, the mother, and if no parent, the brothers and sisters are the next of kin, and so on.— Of kin, of the same kin; having relationship; of the same nature or kind; akin. See akin.
  • n. A chap or chilblain.
  • n. A weight, in use in China and Japan, equal to 601.043 grams, or nearly 1⅓ pounds avoirdupois; a catty.
  • n. A Chinese musical instrument, of very ancient origin, having from five to twenty-five silken strings. It is played like a lute.
  • n. A diminutive suffix, attached to nouns to signify a little object of the kind mentioned: as, lambkin, a little iamb; pipkin, a little pipe: catkin, a little cat, etc.
  • n. Same as kine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. group of people related by blood or marriage
  • n. a person having kinship with another or others
  • adj. related by blood

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English cyn; see genə- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English kin, kyn, ken, kun, from Old English cynn ("kind, sort, rank, quality, family, generation, offspring, pedigree, kin, race, people, gender, sex, propriety, etiquette"), from Proto-Germanic *kunjan (“race, generation, descent”), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (“to produce”). Cognate with Scots kin ("relatives, kinfolk"), North Frisian kinn, kenn ("gender, race, family, kinship"), Dutch kunne ("gender, sex"), Middle Low German kunne ("gender, sex, race, family, lineage"), German Künne, Kunne ("kin, kind, race"), Swedish kön ("gender, sex"), Icelandic kyn ("gender"), Latin genus ("kind, sort, ancestry, birth"), Ancient Greek γένος (genos, "kind, race"), Albanian dhen ("(herd of) small cattle"). (Wiktionary)

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