Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Joy; delight; pleasure.
  • adj. Enjoyable; delightful.

Etymologies

From Middle English, from Old English wynn ("joy, delight, pleasure"), from Proto-Germanic *wunjō (“joy, desire”), from Proto-Indo-European *wun-, *wenǝ- (“to wish, desire, love”). Cognate with Scots win, wind ("pleasure, joy"), German Wonne ("bliss, joy, delight"), Danish ynde ("grace"). See also winly, winsome. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If you want to see some ugly girl selling cloths its ok to me, this scar/whatever don't even bother me, but if you gonna winne because you liked this piece just because after remake all the body and face they forgot a pankake on her arm you think this is beautiful and humam.. geez...

    Hot Topic: You're So Vein

  • Jenny winne 11:38 am on September 21, 2009 | # | Reply it was so good to see it now I am off

    NAZI “MEMORABILIA” WEB SITE » Sociological Images

  • In a war, there is no winne,r and the movie shows that we all pay the price in a war.

    Buzzine » Kevin Bacon

  • Patricia Todd should finally be declared the winne...

    08/14/2006

  • And now ware thei not contented, with the commodities of the fieldes and cattle alone, but by diuers inuencions of handecraftes and sciences, and by sondrie labours of this life, thei sought how to winne.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Age hath there no prerogatiue, except thei winne it with their wisedome, and knowledge.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Calandrino perceiving, that all his protestations could winne no credit with them, who had now the Law remaining in their owne hands, and purposed to deale with him as they pleased: apparantly saw, that sighing and sorrow did nothing availe him.

    The Decameron

  • Upon the clamour and noise of the Lady, the Courtiers quickly flocked thither; and, as lies soone winne beleefe in hasty opinions, upon any silly or shallow surmise: so did her accusation passe for currant, and the Counts advancement being envied by many, made his honest carriage (in this case) the more suspected.

    The Decameron

  • Assure thy selfe, that if entreaties and faire means might not prevalle, force, and compulsion (whatsoever ensued thereon) woulde winne the masterie.

    The Decameron

  • But seeing thou presumest, that all women are so apt and tractable, and thy selfe so confident of thine owne power: I willingly yeeld (for the better assurance of my wifes constant loyalty) to have my head smitten off, if thou canst winne her to any such dishonest act, by any meanes whatsoever thou canst use unto her; which if thou canst not doe, thou shalt onely loose a thousand duckets of Gold.

    The Decameron

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