Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A short, straight, stiff piece of wire with a blunt head and a sharp point, used especially for fastening.
  • n. Something, such as a safety pin, that resembles such a piece of wire in shape or use.
  • n. A whit; a jot: didn't care a pin about the matter.
  • n. A slender, usually cylindrical piece of wood or metal for holding or fastening parts together, or serving as a support for suspending one thing from another, as:
  • n. A thin rod for securing the ends of fractured bones.
  • n. A peg for fixing the crown to the root of a tooth.
  • n. A cotter pin.
  • n. The part of a key stem entering a lock.
  • n. Music One of the pegs securing the strings and regulating their tension on a stringed instrument.
  • n. Nautical A belaying pin.
  • n. Nautical A thole pin.
  • n. An ornament fastened to clothing by means of a clasp.
  • n. A rolling pin.
  • n. Sports One of the wooden clubs at which the ball is aimed in bowling.
  • n. Sports A flagstick.
  • n. Sports See fall.
  • n. Informal The legs: spry for his age, and steady on his pins.
  • n. Electronics A lead on a device that plugs into a socket to connect the device to a system.
  • n. Computer Science Any of the pegs on the platen of a printer, which engage holes at the edges of paper.
  • n. Computer Science Any of the styluses that form a dot matrix on a printer.
  • n. Computer Science Any of the small metal prongs at the end of a connector that fit into the holes in a port.
  • transitive v. To fasten or secure with or as if with a pin or pins.
  • transitive v. To transfix.
  • transitive v. To place in a position of trusting dependence: He pinned his faith on an absurdity.
  • transitive v. To hold fast; immobilize: The passenger was pinned under the wreckage of the truck.
  • transitive v. Sports To win a fall from in wrestling.
  • transitive v. To give (a woman) a fraternity pin in token of attachment.
  • adj. Having a grain suggestive of the heads of pins. Used of leather.
  • pin down To fix or establish clearly: was finally able to pin down the cause of the disease.
  • pin down To force (someone) to give firm opinions or precise information: The reporter pinned the governor down on the issue of capital punishment.
  • pin on To attribute (a crime) to (someone): The murder was pinned on the wrong suspect.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small device, made (usually) of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.
  • n. A small nail with a head and a sharp point.
  • n. A cylinder often of wood or metal used to fasten or as a bearing between two parts.
  • n. A slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.
  • n. A leg.
  • n. Any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector.
  • n. A piece of jewellery that is attached to clothing with a pin.
  • n. A simple accessory that can be attached to clothing with a pin or fastener, often round and bearing a design, logo or message, and used for decoration, identification or to show political affiliation, etc.
  • n. A scenario in which moving a lesser piece which is under attack would expose a more valuable piece to attack.
  • n. The spot at the exact centre of the house (the target area)
  • n. A mood, a state of being.
  • v. To fasten or attach (something) with a pin.
  • v. To cause (a piece) to be in a pin.
  • v. To pin down (someone).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A piece of wood, metal, etc., generally cylindrical, used for fastening separate articles together, or as a support by which one article may be suspended from another; a peg; a bolt.
  • n. Especially, a small, pointed and headed piece of brass or other wire (commonly tinned), largely used for fastening clothes, attaching papers, etc.
  • n. Hence, a thing of small value; a trifle.
  • n. That which resembles a pin in its form or use.
  • n. A peg in musical instruments, for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings.
  • n. A linchpin.
  • n. A rolling-pin.
  • n. A clothespin.
  • n. A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal.
  • n. The tenon of a dovetail joint.
  • n. One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each man should drink.
  • n. The bull's eye, or center, of a target; hence, the center.
  • n. Mood; humor.
  • n. Caligo. See Caligo.
  • n. An ornament, as a brooch or badge, fastened to the clothing by a pin.
  • n. The leg.
  • transitive v. To peen.
  • transitive v. To inclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.
  • transitive v. To fasten with, or as with, a pin; to join

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To fasten or secure with a bolt or peg.
  • To fasten with a pin or pins.
  • To transfix with or as with a pin; hence, to seize and hold fast in the same spot or position.
  • To nab; seize; steal.
  • To swage by striking with the peen of a hammer, as in splaying an edge of an iron hoop to give it a flare corresponding to that of the cask.
  • To clog the teeth of: as, to pin a file: said of particles which adhere so firmly to the teeth of a file that they have to be picked out with a piece of steel wire.
  • To inclose; confine; pen or pound.
  • To aim at or strike with a stone.
  • In chess, to attack (a piece) in such a fashion that it cannot be moved without leaving the king or queen in check.
  • n. A wooden or metal peg or bolt used to fasten or hold a thing in place, fasten things together, or as a point of attachment or support.
  • n. A peg or bolt serving to keep a wheel on its axle; a linch pin.
  • n. A peg on the side of a boat, serving to keep the oar in place; a thole. Also called thole-pin, boat-pin.
  • n. A peg of a stringed musical instrument. See peg, 1 .
  • n. A peg used to stop a hole.
  • n. In machinery, a short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal.
  • n. The axis of a sheave.
  • n. In joinery, the projecting part of a dovetail, which fits into the socket or receiving part.
  • n. That part of the stem of a key which enters the lock.
  • n. A peg, nail, or stud serving to mark a position, step, or degree; hence, a notch; a step; a degree.
  • n. Specifically
  • n. One of a row of pegs let into a drinking-vessel to regulate the quantity which each person was to drink; hence, a drinking-bout; joviality. See on a merry pin, below.
  • n. A nail or stud (also called a pike) marking the center of a target; hence, the center; a central part.
  • n. One of a number of pieces of wood, of more or less cylindrical form, which are placed upright at one end of a bowling-alley, to be bowled down by the player; a skittle; hence, in the plural form, a game played with such pins. Compare ninepins, tenpins.
  • n. A cylindrical roller made of wood; a rolling-pin.
  • n. A leg: as, to knock one off his pins.
  • n. 6. A peak; pinnacle.
  • n. A small piece of wire, generally brass and tinned, pointed at one end and with a rounded head at the other, used for fastening together pieces of cloth, paper, etc., and for other purposes.
  • n. Hence A thing of very small value; a trifle; a very small amount.
  • n. A straight, slender, and pointed bar with an ornamental head or attachment, used by women to secure laces, shawls, etc., or the hair, and by men to secure the cravat or scarf, or for mere ornament. Compare hairpin, safety-pin, scarf-pin, shawl-pin.
  • n. A knot in timber.
  • n. A noxious humor in a hawk's foot.
  • n. One of the pins in a flask which fit into openings in the lugs of another flask, so that, after the pattern is drawn, the two parts can be replaced in their original position.
  • n. One of the dowels by which the patterns are held together, when, for convenience in molding, they are made in two or more parts.
  • n. A spot or web on the eye: usually in the phrase pin and (or) web.
  • n. In archery, a place in a bowstaff where a lateral twig has been trimmed off. Such places are weak if the twig is out off flush.
  • n. In ccram., a small three-sided rod of fire-clay inserted in the side of the saggar to support the ware (as a plate) while it is fired in the kiln.
  • n. A tapered wooden pin having a split in the small end, in which a wedge is inserted to keep the pin from falling out.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. to hold fast or prevent from moving
  • n. a piece of jewelry that is pinned onto the wearer's garment
  • n. when a wrestler's shoulders are forced to the mat
  • n. small markers inserted into a surface to mark scores or define locations etc.
  • n. a club-shaped wooden object used in bowling; set up in triangular groups of ten as the target
  • v. immobilize a piece
  • n. cylindrical tumblers consisting of two parts that are held in place by springs; when they are aligned with a key the bolt can be thrown
  • n. flagpole used to mark the position of the hole on a golf green
  • n. a number you choose and use to gain access to various accounts
  • v. pierce with a pin
  • n. axis consisting of a short shaft that supports something that turns
  • n. a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
  • n. a holder attached to the gunwale of a boat that holds the oar in place and acts as a fulcrum for rowing
  • v. attach or fasten with pins or as if with pins
  • n. informal terms for the leg

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English pinn, perhaps from Latin pinna, feather.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English pinne, from Old English pinn ("pin, peg, bolt"), from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (“protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail”), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- (“protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge”). Cognate with Dutch pin ("peg, pin"), Low German pin, pinne ("pin, point, nail, peg"), German Pinn, Pinne ("pin, tack, peg"), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer ("sharpened point"), Danish pind ("pin, pointed stick"), Norwegian pinn ("knitting-needle"), Swedish pinne ("peg, rod, stick"), Icelandic pinni ("pin"). More at pintle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • A Plastic Nightmare.

    December 11, 2008

  • Eating and drinking went together: so that they soon got into a merry pin, and made a roaring noise.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 1 ch. 5

    September 12, 2008

  • Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
    to present (a young woman) with a fraternity pin as a pledge of affection

    Also "going steady"

    February 3, 2008

  • If you squint, I could be a chamois. Instead of a fox.

    Of course, this has to regard the 'ch' as a single letter. Which it is, kind of, since 'h' is not a real letter in Gaelic, just there for lenition purposes.

    November 3, 2007

  • Channois: sionnach in reverse! Sounds distinctly French.

    November 3, 2007

  • aha! ( = !aha in reverse)

    November 3, 2007

  • (: ...ylkciuq stsil eht pu uoy sevom ti tuB

    November 3, 2007

  • sseltiw yleugav & suoivbo

    November 3, 2007

  • Nip in reverse.

    November 3, 2007

  • Personal Identification Number

    February 28, 2007