Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The power or quality of pleasing or delighting; attractiveness: a breezy tropical setting of great charm.
  • n. A particular quality that attracts; a delightful characteristic: A mischievous grin was among the child's many charms.
  • n. A small ornament, such as one worn on a bracelet.
  • n. An item worn for its supposed magical benefit, as in warding off evil; an amulet.
  • n. An action or formula thought to have magical power.
  • n. The chanting of a magic word or verse; incantation.
  • n. Physics A quantum property of the charm quark whose conservation explains the absence of certain strange-particle decay modes and that accounts for the longevity of the J particle.
  • transitive v. To attract or delight greatly: the simple elegance of the meal charmed the guests.
  • transitive v. To induce by using strong personal attractiveness: charmed the guard into admitting them without invitations.
  • transitive v. To cast or seem to cast a spell on; bewitch.
  • intransitive v. To be alluring or pleasing.
  • intransitive v. To function as an amulet or charm.
  • intransitive v. To use magic spells.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An object, act or words believed to have magic power.
  • n. The ability to persuade, delight or arouse admiration; often constructed in the plural.
  • n. A quantum number of hadrons determined by the quantity of charm quarks & antiquarks.
  • n. A small trinket on a bracelet or chain, etc.
  • v. To seduce, persuade or fascinate someone or something.
  • v. To use a magical charm upon someone/something.
  • n. The mixed sound of many voices, especially of birds or children.
  • n. A flock, group (especially of finches).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A melody; a song.
  • n. A word or combination of words sung or spoken in the practice of magic; a magical combination of words, characters, etc.; an incantation.
  • n. That which exerts an irresistible power to please and attract; that which fascinates; any alluring quality.
  • n. Anything worn for its supposed efficacy to the wearer in averting ill or securing good fortune.
  • n. Any small decorative object worn on the person, as a seal, a key, a silver whistle, or the like. Bunches of charms are often worn at the watch chain.
  • n. a property of certain quarks which may take the value of +1, -1 or 0.
  • intransitive v. To use magic arts or occult power; to make use of charms.
  • intransitive v. To act as, or produce the effect of, a charm; to please greatly; to be fascinating.
  • intransitive v. To make a musical sound.
  • transitive v. To make music upon; to tune.
  • transitive v. To subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence; to affect by magic.
  • transitive v. To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.
  • transitive v. To attract irresistibly; to delight exceedingly; to enchant; to fascinate.
  • transitive v. To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To subdue, control, or bind, as if by incantation or magical influence; soothe, allay, or appease.
  • To fortify or make invulnerable with charms.
  • To give exquisite pleasure to; fascinate; enchant.
  • To affect by or as if by magic or supernatural influences: as, to charm a serpent out of his hole or into a stupor; to charm away one's grief; to charm the wind into silence.
  • To play upon; produce musical sounds from.
  • = Syn. 1, 2, and Fascinate, etc. (see enchant), delight, transport, bewitch, ravish, enrapture, captivate.
  • To produce the effect of a charm; work with magic power; act as a charm or spell.
  • To give delight; be highly pleasing: as, a melody that could charm more than any other.
  • To give forth musical sounds.
  • n. A melody; a song.
  • n. Anything believed to possess some occult or supernatural power, such as an amulet, a spell, or some mystic observance or act.
  • n. Hence A trinket, such as a locket, seal, etc., worn especially on a watch-guard.
  • n. An irresistible power to please and attract, or something which possesses this power; fascination; allurement; attraction.
  • n. Synonyms Spell, enchantment, witchery, magic.
  • n. The confused low murmuring of a flock of birds; chirm.
  • n. In hawking, a company: said of goldfinches.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. something believed to bring good luck
  • n. a verbal formula believed to have magical force
  • v. protect through supernatural powers or charms
  • v. induce into action by using one's charm
  • v. attract; cause to be enamored
  • n. (physics) one of the six flavors of quark
  • v. control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft
  • n. attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates

Etymologies

Middle English charme, magic spell, from Old French, from Latin carmen, incantation.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English charme (chant, magic spell)< Old French< Latin carmen (song, incantation) (Wiktionary)
Variant of chirm, perhaps after Etymology 1, above. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And no matter how odd my request seemed, * charm so Lupin can't read* I didn't tell him why I wanted one, just that I wanted one * ends charm* he let me have one!

    katebell Diary Entry

  • It sent me to the hospital, got me addicted, and now i have to come back sometimes just to make sure im okay. * charm so gin can't read*They also suggested me to go into drug rehab, but I don't think i need it, really. * end charm*

    katebell Diary Entry

  • That we broke up. * charm so nobody can read* you don't know how hard/weird that is to say. * end charm* but anyways, heres what it said.

    katebell Diary Entry

  • WHATEVER!! hehe well I'm gunna * charm so ron can't read* PRETEND TO * end charm* sleep. .so bye! love you all ... some more then others ...

    katebell Diary Entry

  • * charm so only people who know can read* I went to see Dr. Robinson again (ooc: that is if he's still around, jackie or hay, if hes not, let me know lol. thanks bunches) I can't believe that its almost been a year. my minds been elsewhere today*end charm** charm so only alyssa & em can read* Its almost been a year. god DAMNIT.

    katebell Diary Entry

  • IV. xii.25 (227,3) this grave charm] I know not by what authority, nor for what reason, _this_ grave _charm_, which the first, the only original copy exhibits, has been through all the modern editors changed to _this_ gay _charm_.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • Barbie has been around for 50 years; although she has never been given a decisive storyline for her life that would translate into a concrete idea for a movie (however cheesy it might wind up being) part of her charm is the fact that she has been and done everything.

    The Barbie movie: Plastic fantastic or dollpocalypse now? | EW.com

  • And they had things like talking about the fact that Kerry -- John Kerry is trying to fill what they called the charm gap by picking John Edwards.

    CNN Transcript Jul 6, 2004

  • Strolling through the picture-gallery with an old friend, she who, though born to millions, kept fresh that perfume of womanliness which we call charm: "You look tired to-night," said he.

    Impressions of a War Correspondent

  • Her greatest charm was precisely what we call charm -- a sweetly willing, pliant disposition, an air of gay seriousness, such as a child has, and a mood which could run swiftly, at the touch on some secret spring, from the ripple of laughter to the urgency of tears.

    The Fool Errant

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Comments

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  • a company of birds, a flock, expression used by Milton
    _A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs and Ancient Customs, by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillips, 1881

    February 26, 2008

  • theres a word for a shy player... charming

    December 20, 2006