Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The action of a lever.
  • n. The mechanical advantage of a lever.
  • n. Positional advantage; power to act effectively: "started his . . . career with far more social leverage than his father had enjoyed” ( Doris Kearns Goodwin).
  • n. The use of credit or borrowed funds to improve one's speculative capacity and increase the rate of return from an investment, as in buying securities on margin.
  • transitive v. To provide (a company) with leverage.
  • transitive v. To supplement (money, for example) with leverage.
  • transitive v. To improve or enhance: "It makes more sense to be able to leverage what we [public radio stations] do in a more effective way to our listeners” ( Delano Lewis).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A force compounded by means of a lever rotating around a pivot; see torque.
  • n. By extension, any influence which is compounded or used to gain an advantage.
  • n. The use of borrowed funds with a contractually determined return to increase the ability of a business to invest and earn an expected higher return, but usually at high risk.
  • n. The ability to earn very high returns when operating at high capacity utilization of a facility.
  • v. To use; to exploit; to take full advantage (of something).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The action of a lever; mechanical advantage gained by the lever.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The action of a lever; the arrangement by which lever-power is gained.
  • n. Lever-power; the mechanical advantage or power gained by using a lever.
  • n. Figuratively, advantage for accomplishing a purpose; increased power of action.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. supplement with leverage
  • n. the mechanical advantage gained by being in a position to use a lever
  • v. provide with leverage
  • n. investing with borrowed money as a way to amplify potential gains (at the risk of greater losses)
  • n. strategic advantage; power to act effectively

Etymologies

lever +‎ -age (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • On the label leverage in the quarter, which was clearly quite significant, I wonder if you'd give us just a bit more color around how you achieved that?

    SeekingAlpha.com: Home Page

  • G20 participants did not say how the 440 billion-euro European Financial Stability Facility might be altered although French Finance Minister Francois Baroin used the word leverage' in comments to reporters.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No details were given of how the EFSF might be altered, although French Finance Minister Francois Baroin used the word "leverage" in comments to reporters.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • G20 participants did not say how the 440 billion-euro European Financial Stability Facility might be altered although French Finance Minister Francois Baroin used the word "leverage" in comments to reporters.

    Reuters: Press Release

  • G20 participants did not say how the 440 billion euro EFSF might be altered although French Finance Minister Francois Baroin used the word "leverage" in comments to reporters.

    Reuters: Press Release

  • G20 participants did not say how the EFSF might be altered and French Finance Minister Francois Baroin used the word "leverage" in comments to reporters on Thursday.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • That's what you call leverage in negotiating with Apple, which it is.

    SeekingAlpha.com: Home Page

  • In some instances, people break their silence only when they are arrested and use what they know as leverage to secure a lesser charge or sentence.

    timesunion.com: Local Breaking News

  • Once we say we’re leaving our main leverage is we can still do airstrikes on anybody we want, any time.

    Matthew Yglesias » Stay Calm

  • Regulating leverage is obviously the biggest single thing you can do.

    Matthew Yglesias » FDIC Considering Higher Fees for Banks With Unsound Compensation Practices

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Comments

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  • Đòn bẩy, tận dụng
    While financial leverage can be dangerous, emotional leverage can be the most
    powerful tool in personal change. We need a reason to do things. Without a
    compelling reason, nothing will get done. The right reason provides the leverage
    to do massive things even with little resources.

    March 22, 2011