Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The class of phenomena exhibited by a magnetic field.
  • n. The study of magnets and their effects.
  • n. The force exerted by a magnetic field.
  • n. Unusual power to attract, fascinate, or influence: the magnetism of money.
  • n. Animal magnetism.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The property of being magnetic
  • n. The science which treats of magnetic phenomena.
  • n. Power of attraction; power to excite the feelings and to gain the affections.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The property, quality, or state, of being magnetic; the manifestation of the force in nature which is seen in a magnet. At one time it was believed to be separate from the electrical force, but it is now known to be intimately associated with electricity, as part of the phenomenon of electromagnetism.
  • n. The science which treats of magnetic phenomena.
  • n. Power of attraction; power to excite the feelings and to gain the affections.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That peculiar property occasionally possessed by certain bodies (more especially by iron and steel) whereby, under certain circumstances, they naturally attract or repel one another according to determinate laws.
  • n. That branch of science which treats of the properties of the magnet, and of magnetic phenomena in general.
  • n. Attractive power; capacity for exciting sympathetic interest or attention: as, the magnetism of eloquence; personal magnetism.
  • n. See mesmerism and hypnotism.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. attraction for iron; associated with electric currents as well as magnets; characterized by fields of force
  • n. the branch of science that studies magnetism

Etymologies

magnet + -ism (Wiktionary)

Examples

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