Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The liturgical headdress and part of the insignia of a Christian bishop. In the Western church it is a tall pointed hat with peaks in front and back, worn at all solemn functions.
  • n. A thong for binding the hair, worn by women in ancient Greece.
  • n. The ceremonial headdress worn by ancient Jewish high priests.
  • n. A miter joint.
  • n. The edge of a piece of material that has been beveled preparatory to making a miter joint.
  • n. A miter square.
  • transitive v. To bestow a miter upon.
  • transitive v. To make (two pieces or surfaces) join with a miter joint.
  • transitive v. To bevel the edges of for joining with a miter joint.
  • intransitive v. To meet in a miter joint.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To finish a material at an angle, frequently 45 degrees, or sometimes with some specific shape, so that it will fit up tightly against another piece of material, as with a picture frame.
  • n. Alternative form of miter joint.
  • n. Alternative spelling of mitre.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by bishops and other church dignitaries. It has been made in many forms, the present form being a lofty cap with two points or peaks.
  • n. The surface forming the beveled end or edge of a piece where a miter joint is made; also, a joint formed or a junction effected by two beveled ends or edges; a miter joint.
  • n. A sort of base money or coin.
  • intransitive v. To meet and match together, as two pieces of molding, on a line bisecting the angle of junction.
  • transitive v. To place a miter upon; to adorn with a miter.
  • transitive v. To match together, as two pieces of molding or brass rule on a line bisecting the angle of junction; to fit together in a miter joint.
  • transitive v. To bevel the ends or edges of, for the purpose of matching together at an angle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bestow a miter upon; raise to a rank to which the dignity of wearing a miter belongs, especially to episcopal rank.
  • To ornament with a miter.
  • In carpentry, to join with a miter-joint; make a miter-joint in. See miter-joint.
  • In needlework, to change the direction of, as a straight band, border, or the like, by cutting it at an abrupt angle, sacrificing a three-cornered piece, and bringing the cut edges together: a term derived from carpenter-work.
  • In bookbinding, to join perfectly, as lines intended to meet at right angles
  • In architecture, to meet in a miter-joint.
  • In organ-building, to introduce one or more miter-joints into (a pipe), so as to adapt it to a contracted space: such a pipe is said to be mitered or mitered over.
  • n. A form of head-dress anciently worn by the inhabitants of Lydia, Phrygia, and other parts of Asia Minor.
  • n. A sacerdotal head-dress, as that worn by the ancient Jewish high priest, or that worn by a bishop.
  • n. A chimney-cap or -pot of terra-cotta, brick, stone, or metal, designed to exclude rain and wind from the flue, while allowing the smoke, etc., to escape; a cowl; hence, anything having a similar use.
  • n. In conchology, a miter-shell.
  • n. In carp.: A scribe or guide for making saw-cuts to form miter-joints.
  • n. A combined square and miter-edge or pattern.
  • n. Same as miter-joint.
  • n. A gusset in seamstresses' work, knitting, and the like.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. fit together in a miter joint
  • n. joint that forms a corner; usually both sides are bevelled at a 45-degree angle to form a 90-degree corner
  • v. confer a miter on (a bishop)
  • v. bevel the edges of, to make a miter joint
  • n. the surface of a beveled end of a piece where a miter joint is made
  • n. a liturgical headdress worn by bishops on formal occasions

Etymologies

Middle English mitre, from Old French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin mitra, headdress of the Jewish high priest, from Greek.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • I don't know what an auxiliary bishop is, but his miter is a might smaller than a real bishop's.

    Archive 2007-07-01

  • By the way, if you like that hat which is called a miter or mitre, in Britain, I commend to you this photoessay.

    Clergytastical - Danya Ruttenberg

  • This is called the "miter" and may be 45 degrees or any other angle.

    Handwork in Wood

  • It always amazes me how densely populated these lefebvreites are with people who don the pope's miter as if it were their natural right ...

    A little snag with the SSPX reunion

  • The sharp buzz of the miter saw filled the backyard soon after, its noise gearing up to a tearing crescendo before tapering off to a low whine and then starting up again.

    O' Bending Light

  • She dragged out her husband's old miter saw and two paint flecked saw-horses.

    O' Bending Light

  • With a long white beard and wearing his episcopal miter he rides his gray horse over the rooftops.

    Santa Claus's Dutch Uncle

  • He gets a saw and his miter box and cuts two chunks of wood from a redwood two by four.

    The Heron

  • Thus his tables rarely show cracks and loosened miter joints resulting from wood shrinkage over time.

    Furniture for a Young Nation

  • There is something, isn't there, about putting one foot in front of the other, keeping things simple, lining up the precise point of miter joint to insure a solid foundation.

    The Poem

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Comments

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  • A person who breeds mites for fun and/or profit.

    April 17, 2008

  • Also see mitre, as well as frindley's research at Hats Off!.

    April 17, 2008

  • Does it become a mitre when it's on a bishop's head?

    April 17, 2008