Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Outward appearance or aspect; semblance.
  • n. False appearance; pretense: spoke to me under the guise of friendship.
  • n. Mode of dress; garb: huddled on the street in the guise of beggars.
  • n. Obsolete Custom; habit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Customary way of speaking or acting; fashion, manner, practice (often used formerly in such phrases as "at his own guise"; that is, in his own fashion, to suit himself.)
  • n. External appearance in manner or dress; appropriate indication or expression; garb; shape.
  • n. Misleading appearance; cover, cloak
  • n. guys.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Customary way of speaking or acting; custom; fashion; manner; behavior; mien; mode; practice; -- often used formerly in such phrases as: .
  • n. External appearance in manner or dress; appropriate indication or expression; garb; shape.
  • n. Cover; cloak.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To dress as a guiser; assume or act the part of a guiser.
  • To place a guise or garb on; dress.
  • n. Way; manner; mode; fashion; practice; custom.
  • n. Manner of acting; mien; cast or behavior.
  • n. External appearance as determined by costume; dress; garb: as, the guise of a shepherd.
  • n. Hence Appearance or semblance in general; aspect or seeming.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an artful or simulated semblance

Etymologies

Middle English, manner, fashion, from Old French, of Germanic origin; see weid- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English guise, gise, gyse, from Old French guisse, guise, vise ("guise, manner, way"), from Old Frankish *wīsa (“manner, way, fashion”), from Proto-Germanic *wīsōn, *manner, way, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (“to see, view, behold, perceive”). Cognate with Old High German wīsa ("way, manner"), Old English wīse ("wise, way, fashion, custom, habit, manner"). More at wise. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • appearance, disguise. Under the guise of the night the soilders marched forward. (newbury dic.)

    December 6, 2010

  • hi guise, how are YOOOUUUU doing?

    April 10, 2009

  • Scots - to go around in fancy dress on the night of Halloween. A person who goes out guising is a guiser.

    December 5, 2007