Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The buying or selling of ecclesiastical pardons, offices, or emoluments.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of buying and selling ecclesiastical offices and pardons.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The crime of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferment; the corrupt presentation of any one to an ecclesiastical benefice for money or reward.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act or practice of trafficking in sacred things; particularly, the buying or selling of ecclesiastical preferment, or the corrupt presentation of any one to an ecclesiastical benefice for money or reward.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. traffic in ecclesiastical offices or preferments

Etymologies

Middle English simonie, from Old French, from Late Latin simōnia, after Simon Magus, a sorcerer who tried to buy spiritual powers from the Apostle Peter (Acts 8:9-24).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French simonie, from Late Latin simonia, named from Simon Magus, with reference to Acts 8:18-20: (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Divine laws the term simony is applicable only to the exchange of supernatural treasures for temporal advantages, its meaning has been further extended through ecclesiastical legislation.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • The term simony comes from a sorcerer named Simon Magus, who tried to bribe the Apostles into selling him their power (Acts 8: 18-20).

    orrologion

  • (Acts 8: 9-24) The memory of his peculiar guilt has been perpetuated in the word simony, as applied to all traffic in spiritual offices.

    Smith's Bible Dictionary

  • It had been told him that his admission into the Order had been connected with the bestowal of temporal goods, and from this comes the sin called simony, which consists in the purchase of something spiritual with something temporal.

    The Life of Blessed Henry Suso by Himself.

  • V with regard to episcopal elections, and passed several disciplinary decrees directed against existing abuses, such as simony and concubinage among the clergy.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

  • For this kind of simony places on a par things supernatural and things natural, things eternal and things temporal, and constitutes a sacrilegious depreciation of Divine treasures.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • They followed no definite ecclesiastico-political programme, but directed their attacks principally against individual offences such as simony, marriage of the clergy, and the uncanonical marriage of the laity.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • One such sin, so subtle, so dangerous, and so constantly recurring in Christian history, having taken the name of its first author and being called "simony," has been handed down from generation to generation.

    The Ministry of the Spirit

  • Preeminent among Luther's complaints were the practice of selling of indulgences (essentially, the selling of forgiveness for sin), the practice of "simony" (selling church positions), and the Church's policy on purgatory.

    The Vail Trail - All Sections

  • She supported synods that reformed abuses that were so prevalent at the time, such as simony and usury.

    Catholic Exchange

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  • NOUN: The buying or selling of ecclesiastical pardons, offices, or emoluments.
    ETYMOLOGY: Middle English simonie, from Old French, from Late Latin simnia, after Simon Magus, a sorcerer who tried to buy spiritual powers from the Apostle Peter (Acts 8:9–24).
    OTHER FORMS: simo·nist —NOUN

    May 15, 2007