Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The passage of people or vehicles along routes of transportation.
  • n. Vehicles or pedestrians in transit: heavy traffic on the turnpike; stopped oncoming traffic to let the children cross.
  • n. The commercial exchange of goods; trade.
  • n. Illegal or improper commercial activity: drug traffic on city streets.
  • n. The business of moving passengers and cargo through a transportation system. See Synonyms at business.
  • n. The amount of cargo or number of passengers conveyed.
  • n. The conveyance of messages or data through a system of communication: routers that manage Internet traffic.
  • n. Messages or data conveyed through such a system: a tremendous amount of telephone traffic on Mother's Day; couldn't download the file due to heavy Internet traffic.
  • n. Social or verbal exchange; communication: refused further traffic with the estranged friend.
  • intransitive v. To carry on trade or other dealings: trafficked in liquidation merchandise; traffic with gangsters.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Pedestrians or vehicles on roads, or the flux or passage thereof.
  • n. Commercial transportation or exchange of goods, or the movement of passengers or people.
  • n. Illegal trade or exchange of goods, often drugs.
  • n. Exchange or flux of information, messages or data, as in a computer or telephone network.
  • v. To pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or money; to buy or sell goods; to barter; to trade.
  • v. To trade meanly or mercenarily; to bargain.
  • v. To exchange in traffic; to effect by a bargain or for a consideration.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Commerce, either by barter or by buying and selling; interchange of goods and commodities; trade.
  • n. Commodities of the market.
  • n. The business done upon a railway, steamboat line, etc., with reference to the number of passengers or the amount of freight carried.
  • intransitive v. To pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or money; to buy or sell goods; to barter; to trade.
  • intransitive v. To trade meanly or mercenarily; to bargain.
  • transitive v. To exchange in traffic; to effect by a bargain or for a consideration.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To trade; pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or money; buy and sell wares or commodities; carry on commerce.
  • To deal; have business or dealings.
  • To exchange in traffic; barter, or buy and sell.
  • To bargain; negotiate; arrange.
  • n. An interchange of goods, merchandise, or property of any kind between countries, communities, or individuals; trade; commerce.
  • n. The coming and going of persons or the transportation of goods along a line of travel, as on a road, railway, canal, or steamship route.
  • n. Hence The persons or goods, collectively, passing or carried along a route or routes.
  • n. Dealings; intercourse.
  • n. A piece of business; a transaction.
  • n. The subject of traffic; commodities marketed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the amount of activity over a communication system during a given period of time
  • n. the aggregation of things (pedestrians or vehicles) coming and going in a particular locality during a specified period of time
  • v. trade or deal a commodity
  • n. buying and selling; especially illicit trade
  • v. deal illegally
  • n. social or verbal interchange (usually followed by `with')

Etymologies

French trafic, from Old French trafique, from Old Italian traffico, from trafficare, to trade, perhaps from Catalan trafegar, to decant, from Vulgar Latin *trānsfaecāre : trāns-, trans- + faex, faec-, dregs; see feces.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle French trafique ("traffic"), from Italian traffico ("traffic") from Italian trafficare ("to carry on trade"). Potentially from Vulgar Latin *transfricare (“to rub across”). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Read the etymology right to the end. Now you know what the -fic in fanfic stands for!

    July 6, 2012