Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Household items such as utensils, pots, and pans made from tin, generally before the development of metals with other benefits.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Articles made of tinned iron.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Wares of tin; articles, especially vessels for holding liquids, made of tin-plate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. articles of commerce made of tin plate

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Although called tinware, it really was zinc, and was susceptible, through much hard work, of a high polish, but this "polishing tinware" was a fearful curse to the poor prisoner.

    Bidwell's Travels, from Wall Street to London Prison Fifteen Years in Solitude

  • 'tinware' -- I hope later to convince of the indelicacy of such allusion -- would place you in England on a social level above any we ever occupied, or could hope to.

    Laddie; a true blue story

  • Now a bag of remarkable clothes - pins, next, a wonderful nutmeg grater which fell to pieces at the first trial, a knife cleaner that spoiled all the knives, or a sweeper that picked the nap neatly off the carpet and left the dirt, labor-saving soap that took the skin off one's hands, infallible cements which stuck firmly to nothing but the fingers of the de - luded buyer, and every kind of tinware, from a toy savings bank for odd pennies, to a wonderful boiler which would wash articles in its own steam with every prospect of exploding in the process.

    Little Women

  • Oh, I'll sham it with the best in public, and sport my tinware, but I know what I am, and there's no room for honest pride in me, you see.

    The Sky Writer

  • I duly admired it before we went to dinner in an ante-room; it was a small party at table, Flashy in full Lancer fig with V.C. and assorted tinware, two young aides pop-eyed with worship, and Grey himself.

    THE NUMBERS

  • Well, bless the dear little snail-eaters, thinks I, for while I've collected a fair bit of undeserved tinware in my time, you can't have too much of it, you know.

    Watershed

  • For others, well, the catalog is a gateway to the material culture of the colonial past in North America, featuring everything from tinware lanterns and redware porringers to clothing and patterns, even 18th-century scissors for do-it-yourselfers.

    Applause for Re-Enactors

  • Here, the late Yong Nam Hin (1932-2003), grandson of the founder, puts in a day's work at the tinware maker in this 2001 photograph.

    Scenes From Malacca

  • The heavy vibrations went through the small kitchen, making plates and tinware rattle loudly.

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • It was thus that, strolling west along River Street on which were a number of other kinds of factories, and then north through a few other streets that held more factories — tinware, wickwire, a big vacuum carpet cleaning plant, a rug manufacturing company, and the like — that he came finally upon a miserable slum, the like of which, small as it was, he had not seen outside of Chicago or Kansas City.

    An American Tragedy

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  • (n): formerly, cooking utensils made from tin. Tinware has good conductivity but it is readily scuffed or scratched and rusts easily. It turns dark after use and is discolored by acidic foods.

    January 5, 2009