Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small child.
  • n. A small amount, as of liquor.
  • transitive v. To total: totted up the bill.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small child.
  • n. A measure of spirits, especially rum.
  • n. A foolish fellow.
  • v. To sum or total.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Anything small; -- frequently applied as a term of endearment to a little child.
  • n. A drinking cup of small size, holding about half a pint.
  • n. A foolish fellow.
  • n. Lit., so much; -- a term used in the English exchequer to indicate that a debt was good or collectible for the amount specified, and often written opposite the item.
  • transitive v. To mark with the word “tot”. See tot, n.
  • transitive v. To add; to count; to make up the sum of; to total; -- often with up.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To mark (an account or a name) with the word tot: as, to tot an item in a bill. See tot, n., 1.
  • To count up; add; sum: usually with up.
  • n. Anything small or insignificant; especially, a small child: used as a term of endearment.
  • n. A drinking-cup holding about half a pint; also, a small quantity; especially, when applied to liquor, as much as makes a draught or dram.
  • n. A foolish fellow.
  • n. Originally, so many; so much: formerly written opposite an item in an account to indicate that the debt was good. The full expression is given as tot pecuniæ regi debetur, so much money is due to the king.
  • n. An exercise in addition; a sum.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a young child
  • n. a small amount (especially of a drink)
  • v. determine the sum of

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Shortening of total ("to sum") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the sphere of concrete concepts too it is worth nothing that the German splits up the idea of “killing” into the basic concept of “dead” (tot) and the derivational one of “causing to do (or be) so and so” (by the method of vocalic change, töot -); the German töot-et (analytically tot-+ vowel change+-et) “causes to be dead” is, approximately, the formal equivalent of our dead-en-s, though the idiomatic application of this latter word is different311

    Chapter 5. Form in Language: Grammatical Concepts

  • I did a search for the English word tot and chose a German translation.

    ResearchBuzz

  • I didn't get one; instead I got German search results for the word "tot" - which absolutely doesn't mean child.

    ResearchBuzz

  • Fast-forward a few years and the tot is a school kid practicing his piano lessons with adult focus, the afro still connecting him to the stars on the covers of those beloved records.

    Nightlife agenda

  • Fast-forward a few years and the tot is a school kid practicing his piano lessons with adult-like focus, the afro still connecting him to the stars on the covers of those beloved records.

    Nightlife Agenda

  • Natisha, why is the defense calling tot mom ` s former best friend to the stand, a witness to night after night after night of partying while Caylee ` s missing?

    CNN Transcript Mar 27, 2009

  • Mnr Niehaus sal ook dienooreenkomstig ingelig word tot sy bevrediging;

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • Die vraag moet gevra word tot watter mate die verskuilde agenda van AB ook neerslag vind in die projekte van

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • And it would not matter a bit whether the tot were a little boy or a little girl.

    The Wonders of the Jungle Book One

  • The tot was a trifle shy, but Patty's merry smile soon put her at her ease.

    Patty's Suitors

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