Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To defeat or conquer in battle; subjugate.
  • transitive v. To defeat in a contest, conflict, or competition.
  • transitive v. To overcome or subdue (an emotion, for example); suppress: "She had had to wrench herself forcibly away from Katharine, and every step vanquished her desire” ( Virginia Woolf). See Synonyms at defeat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To defeat, to overcome.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A disease in sheep, in which they pine away.
  • transitive v. To conquer, overcome, or subdue in battle, as an enemy.
  • transitive v. Hence, to defeat in any contest; to get the better of; to put down; to refute.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To conquer; overcome; especially, to subdue in battle, as an enemy.
  • To defeat in any contest, as in argument; get the better of.
  • To confute; show to be erroneous or unfounded; overturn.
  • To overpower; prostrate; be too much for.
  • To overpower the peculiar virtue or properties of; destroy or render inert; neutralize.
  • = Syn. 1. Overcome, Subdue, etc. (see conquer), surmount, overthrow; rout, crush.
  • n. A disease of sheep in which they pine away. Also vinquish.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. come out better in a competition, race, or conflict

Etymologies

Middle English vaynquisshen, from Old French vainquir, vainquiss-, from Latin vincere; see weik-3 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English vaynquisshen, from Old French vanquir, from Latin vincere. (Wiktionary)

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