Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A strip of wood on the neck of a stringed musical instrument against which the strings are pressed in playing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A flat or roughly flat strip on the neck of a stringed instrument, against which the strings are pressed to shorten the vibrating length and produce notes of higher pitches.
  • n. A miniature skateboard that is driven with the fingers.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. the part of a stringed instrument against which the fingers press the strings to vary the tone; the keyboard of a piano, organ, etc.; manual.
  • n. a guidepost resembling a hand with a pointing index finger.
  • n. a bank of keys on a musical instrument.
  • n. a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In the violin, guitar, and similar instruments, the thin, usually rounded, strip of wood on the neck, above which the strings are stretched, and against which, in stopping, they are pressed by the player's fingers. See cut under violin.
  • n. In the pianoforte and organ, the keyboard.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
  • n. a guidepost resembling a hand with a pointing index finger
  • n. a bank of keys on a musical instrument

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • Also called a fretboard, the facing of the neck of a guitar or other stringed instrument onto which the frets are installed. Made of very hard wood such as rosewood, maple, or ebony.

    November 15, 2007