Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A roll, as of parchment or papyrus, used especially for writing a document.
  • n. An ancient book or volume written on such a roll.
  • n. A list or schedule of names.
  • n. An ornament or ornamental design that resembles a partially rolled scroll of paper, as the volute in Ionic and Corinthian capitals.
  • n. Music The curved head on an instrument of the violin family.
  • n. Heraldry A ribbon inscribed with a motto.
  • transitive v. To inscribe on a scroll.
  • transitive v. To roll up into a scroll.
  • transitive v. To ornament with a scroll.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To cause (displayed text or graphics) to move up, down, or across the screen so that a line of text or graphics appears at one edge of the screen for each line that moves off the opposite edge: scroll a document; scroll a page of text.
  • intransitive v. Computer Science To cause displayed text or graphics to move up, down, or across the screen: scrolled down to the end of the document.
  • intransitive v. Computer Science To appear onscreen and roll by: "The information scrolls so fast it's unreadable” ( Creative Computing).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A roll of paper or parchment; a writing formed into a roll; a schedule; a list.
  • n. An ornament formed of undulations giving off spirals or sprays, usually suggestive of plant form. Roman architectural ornament is largely of some scroll pattern.
  • n. Scroll-shaped end of a violin.
  • n. a skew surface.
  • v. To change one's view of data on a computer's display, typically using a scroll bar or a scroll wheel.
  • v. To move in or out of view horizontally or vertically.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A roll of paper or parchment; a writing formed into a roll; a schedule; a list.
  • n. An ornament formed of undulations giving off spirals or sprays, usually suggestive of plant form. Roman architectural ornament is largely of some scroll pattern.
  • n. A mark or flourish added to a person's signature, intended to represent a seal, and in some States allowed as a substitute for a seal.
  • n. Same as Skew surface. See under Skew.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A roll of parchment or paper, or a writing formed into a roll; a list or schedule.
  • n. In a restricted sense, a draft or outline of what is afterward to be written out in full: also used attributively: as, a scroll minute.
  • n. An ornament of a spiral form; an ornament or appendage resembling a partly unrolled sheet Of paper.
  • n. In furniture and woodwork, a carved volute or spiral, especially such an ornament forming the arm of a sofa, rocking-chair, or the like.
  • n. The ribbon-like label proceeding from the mouths of speakers in old tapestries and illustrations.
  • n. In heraldry, the ribbon-like appendage to a crest or escutcheon on which the motto is inscribed. Also escroll.
  • n. In hydraulics, a spiral or converging ajutage or waterway placed around a turbine or other reaction water-wheel to equalize the rate of flow of water at all points around the circumference, by means of the progressive decrease in the capacity of the waterway.
  • n. In geometry, a skew surface, or non-developable ruled surface.
  • n. The mantling or lambrequin of a tilting-helmet.
  • n. In anatomy, a turbinate bone; a scroll-bone.
  • To write down in a scroll or roll of parchment or paper; commit to writing; inscribe.
  • To draft; write in rough outline. See scroll, n., 2.
  • To roll up or form into a scroll.
  • To ornament with scrolls or scrollwork.
  • To roll or curl up.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a document that can be rolled up (as for storage)
  • n. a round shape formed by a series of concentric circles (as formed by leaves or flower petals)
  • v. move through text or graphics in order to display parts that do not fit on the screen

Etymologies

Middle English scrowle, alteration (influenced by rolle, roll) of scrowe, from Old French escroue, escroe, strip of parchment, scroll, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
A diminutive of Old English scroue, scrowe, Late Latin scroa scroll, probably of Teutonic origin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • i am using asp. net ajax combo box control. where i have an items [500 records binded to it]. now as the list grows i am not able to fixed the height with an scroll so that i can limit the height as much i wanted. ** but by default it is setting the scroll**

    ASP.NET Forums

  • A Torah in scroll is related to a bound edition because the latter couldn't exist without the former: the latter rises up from the former, perhaps inevitably.

    Boing Boing: April 18, 2004 - April 24, 2004 Archives

  • The carpenter who built a farmer's house differentiated it from the barn by putting what he called scroll work up under the eaves and by building at the front a porch with carved posts.

    Poor White

  • I still like to delete mail vs. archive on my Gmail via Pre, and I agree the Menu | Move to folder … scroll, scroll, scroll is tedious.

    Make The Palm Pre Archive Instead Of Delete Gmail Messages | Lifehacker Australia

  • By quickly rolling out technologies such as twin scroll turbochargers, gasoline direct injection, electric power steering and improved transmissions with 6-speeds, says George Peterson, president of automotive research firm AutoPacific in Tustin, Calif.

    What's Driving Hyundai's High Mileage

  • The second cover y'all see up on the scroll is not the cover at all, but I haven't seen a final yet, and I'm just relieved my publisher disliked that one.

    Pick up lines

  • Giving your names to put on the marriage scroll is consent.

    YW? coming along

  • Maybe next time, you'll be officially listed and can watch your name scroll by on the credits.

    Morwalela Premiere!

  • The scroll is slightly longer than the novel as it was finally published, after three subsequent conventionally formatted drafts, in 1957.

    August 2007

  • ‘The novel that "On the Road" became was inarguably the book that young people needed in 1957, but the sparse and unassuming scroll is the living version for our time.’

    On The Road: The Original Scroll | Disinformation

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