Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A person who eats or consumes immoderate amounts of food and drink.
  • n. A person with an inordinate capacity to receive or withstand something: a glutton for punishment.
  • n. See wolverine.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. gluttonous; greedy; gormandizing.
  • n. One who eats voraciously, obsessively, or to excess; a gormandizer.
  • n. One who consumes voraciously, obsessively, or to excess
  • n. A carnivorous mammal (Gulo gulo), of the family Mustelidæ, about the size of a large badger. It was formerly believed to be inordinately voracious, whence the name; the wolverine. It is a native of the northern parts of America, Europe, and Asia.
  • v. To glut; to eat voraciously.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who eats voraciously, or to excess; a gormandizer.
  • n. Fig.: One who gluts himself.
  • n. A carnivorous mammal (Gulo gulo formerly Gulo luscus), of the weasel family Mustelidæ, about the size of a large badger; called also wolverine, wolverene and carcajou. It was formerly believed to be inordinately voracious, whence the name. It is a native of the northern parts of America, Europe, and Asia.
  • adj. Gluttonous; greedy; gormandizing.
  • v. To glut; to eat voraciously.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who indulges to excess in eating, or in eating and drinking; one who gorges himself with food; a gormandizer.
  • n. One who indulges in anything to excess; a greedy person.
  • n. In zoöl.: A popular name of the wolverene, Gulo luscus or arcticus, the largest and most voracious species of the family Mustelidæ.
  • Of or belonging to a glutton; gluttonous.
  • To eat or indulge the appetite to excess; gormandize.
  • To overfill, as with food; glut.
  • n. In pugilism, one who takes a great deal of punishment before he is beaten.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excess
  • n. musteline mammal of northern Eurasia

Etymologies

Middle English glotoun, from Old French gloton, from Latin gluttō, gluttōn-.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French gloton, gluton, from Latin gluto, glutonis. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Gourmand has taken on an even fancier ring than gourmet, while the word glutton can be applied only to someone who eats an enormous amount of food at one sitting — usually cheap food, and with the standard of what constitutes “enormous” revised upward each year for obvious reasons.

    Hard to Swallow

  • - If you are a habitual consumer of little cakes, it will jump out in front of you and call you, “fatty!” and you will be plagued every day of your life by being called a glutton and a pig.

    Urban Legends

  • In a society where food is scarce, the glutton is a wasteful menace.

    Link Farm & Open Thread #26

  • He was a carpenter after all, and I am told that carpenters in those days chopped their own trees and milled the wood by hand. and he was semitic. and he was called a glutton and a drunkard by his detractors, so maybe he had a belly and a red nose?

    Philocrites: Christmas loot report.

  • The writer of perhaps the greatest historical novel in the English language, "The Cloister and the Hearth," was what one might call a glutton for thoroughness.

    Imperishable Fiction: An Inquiry into the Short Life of the 'Best Sellers' Reveals the Methods Which Brought into Being the Novels that Endure

  • The writer of perhaps the greatest historical novel in the English language, _The Cloister and the Hearth_, was what one might call a glutton for thoroughness.

    Vanishing Roads and Other Essays

  • She is a little bit of a glutton is my Jane, and she overate herself at tea at the Singletons '.

    A Modern Tomboy A Story for Girls

  • The god of a glutton is his belly; of a lover his lust; and so every man serves that to which he is in bondage; and has his heart there where his treasure is.

    Catena Aurea - Gospel of Matthew

  • Jack O'Brien is already known as a glutton and he gets things started with a feast.

    NPR Topics: News

  • He ate and drank with them, and was called a glutton and a drunkard (Luke 7: 34).

    Think Progress

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