dgstone has looked up 0 words, created 35 lists, listed 228 words, written 41 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 59 words.

Comments by dgstone

  • This word is not in the dictionary even though I think it really should be.

    This comes from the words "to flame." This is an adjective used to describe passionate personalities whose behaviors are uninhibited and loud.

    March 21, 2008

  • I use this word on a regular basis. It is used in literature, music and TV, so I am a little stunned that people don't know how its pronounced.

    March 21, 2008

  • I can't believe that this is the first time this word has been wordied.

    March 19, 2008

  • "The body of persons that a peace officer of a county is empowered to call upon for assistance in preserving the peace, making arrests, and serving writs."

    March 16, 2008

  • Official Definition #3: An example serving as a model; pattern.

    Its meaning probably extends from its alternate definitions: "a display in fixed arrangement of such a set, as boy, boy's, boys, boys'" and "a set of forms all of which contain a particular element, esp. the set of all inflected forms based on a single stem or theme."

    March 16, 2008

  • French meaning "newborn babes" or "just born children," but the name also came to carry the connotation of misshapen after the Hunchback of Notre Dame was published, and then "half formed" after Disney's version of the book came out.

    March 16, 2008

  • An elderly Russian woman, especially one that is a grandmother.

    March 16, 2008

  • Encountered it through Harry Potter. Pronounced "ohl·lee·van·der," I think.

    March 16, 2008

  • I pronounce this as "ahna·stahz·she·a."

    March 16, 2008

  • See perfluorooctanic acid (C8HF15O2). It is called PFOA or C8 for short. An ingredient in Teflon and some carpet stain repellents; it is being phased out because it accumulates in the environment and mammalian fat cells and does not biodegrade in a timely fashion, when it biodegrades at all that is. Relatively safe; just don't work in or live near a Teflon factory until it has been completely phased out.

    March 15, 2008

  • Its full name is pentadecafluorooctanoic acid.

    March 15, 2008

  • Apparently this is pronounced "squay·mis" rather than "squam·is."

    March 15, 2008

  • Pronounced "ahn·new·ee." Gorey's Gashleycrumb Tinies was a stroke of genius.

    March 15, 2008

  • "We certainly are entertaining, Mac."
    "Indubitably, Tosh!"

    March 15, 2008

  • Commonly used by Science Fiction fans. In my house, we also use it in place of "bra."

    March 15, 2008

  • Sadly, IQ testers are rarely as smart as the person reading the test results. A sane smart person rarely decides to do repetitious tasks like that if they can help it.

    BTW, I exaggerated a bit. She wasn't completely speechless. She had the presence of mind to ask me how to spell it after a 30 second delay. *sigh*

    March 15, 2008

  • Pronounced "havre deh gras." The name of the town I was born in. A beautiful place with a beautiful name.

    March 15, 2008

  • Yes, yes. I am definitely one of those. Many words sound beautiful to me, just like a song, so it makes sense that they would get stuck in my head.

    March 15, 2008

  • Define "us" (in your comments to me). If you mean a Wordie, I definitely, definitely am. I am thrilled to have StumbledUpon this site.

    March 14, 2008

  • Use this to finish the phrase, "Marching to the beat of a..."

    March 14, 2008

  • Algonquin for "the hunger." The name of a cannibalistic spirit with an insatiable hunger for human flesh.

    March 14, 2008

  • Pronounced as "ear·row·ehz" in Spanish.

    March 14, 2008

  • I dropped this bomb on my IQ tester. She was speechless.

    March 14, 2008

  • I only wish to expand on the connotation that this word carries for me. I use it to refer to a vegetative landscape in a light spring or summer shower. The plants look gorgeous and lush because the the central vacuole is swollen with water.

    March 14, 2008

  • Algonquin is a gorgeous language, period.

    March 14, 2008

  • Used in the Terminator movies and Science Fiction books to describe beings that can take on the shape of objects in their environment.

    March 14, 2008

  • Looks clunky, yet flows so well when spoken aloud.

    March 14, 2008

  • This word really gets me somehow. I love the way it sounds, and enunciating those two hard syllables in the middle always feels a little exciting and dangerous for me, like it is in danger of falling apart at the junction of those two syllables.

    March 14, 2008

  • Latin for the "voice of the people."

    March 14, 2008

  • I like how severe this word sounds when said out loud.

    March 14, 2008

  • Directions: Use with faux-Italian accent.

    March 14, 2008

  • This word is pleasing to the eyes but its rhythm is a little strange for my ears.

    March 14, 2008

  • A play on "marches to the beat of a different drum", but its such a good phrase that I feel its usage should be expanded.

    March 14, 2008

  • Using this is proof that you do not in fact march to a different kettle of anything. ;)

    March 14, 2008

  • I love the way "expialidocious" sounds when said aloud, but the rest of the word isn't impressive enough to end up on my list.

    March 14, 2008

  • Latin for "something for something." Why does the word quo instantly make anything its part of sound like something used by turned-noses?

    March 14, 2008

  • Prounounced "wen-dee-go", which is Algonquin for "the hunger." A malevolent cannibalistic spirit whose appetite for human flesh can never be satiated.

    March 14, 2008

  • Based off the TV drama "Grey's Anatomy", used to describe events involving people with unnecessarily melodramatic sex lives.

    March 13, 2008

  • This means, "After it, therefore because of it."

    President Josiah Bartlet: "Do you know when we lost Texas, CJ?
    CJ Cregg: "When you learned to speak Latin?"
    President Josiah Bartlet:"Go figure."
    - West Wing

    March 13, 2008

  • Brings to mind a section in the Pirates of Penzance.

    March 13, 2008

  • Kaliningrad is a city in western Russia that sits on the Baltic Sea, near the Polish border. The city itself is nothing special, but its name said aloud is like music to my ears.

    March 13, 2008

  • I get words stuck in my head like songs get stuck in others' heads. Mugwump is one of these words because its just so gosh darn fun to say. I picked it up from the Harry Potter books, but I had no idea it was an actual word until recently.

    March 13, 2008

  • My friend Alan uses this phrase regularly. It started as an accidental bastardization of the two phrases "out of the blue" and "out of left field," but no one caught the mistake for years, not even his wife. Because the four words flow so well together, we now shamelessly use this phrase to replace "out of the blue."

    March 13, 2008

Comments for dgstone

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  • "Us" meaning onomatomaniacs, a subgroup of Wordies. And welcome to the club! :-D

    March 14, 2008

  • Uh oh. Another one of us. ;-)

    March 14, 2008

  • Welcome, dgstone! Your comment on mugwump marks you as afflicted with (reveling in?) onomatomania.

    March 13, 2008