Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Serving to indicate: symptoms indicative of anemia; an insignia indicative of high rank.
  • adj. Grammar Of, relating to, or being the mood of the verb used in ordinary objective statements.
  • n. Grammar The indicative mood.
  • n. Grammar A verb in the indicative mood.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. serving as a sign, indication or suggestion of something
  • adj. of, or relating to the indicative mood
  • n. the indicative mood

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious.
  • adj. Suggestive; representing the whole by a part, as a fleet by a ship, a forest by a tree, etc.
  • n. The indicative mood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious; showing.
  • In grammar, noting that mode of the verb which indicates (that is, simply predicates or affirms), without any further modal implication: as, he writes; he is writing; they run; has the mail arrived?
  • n. In grammar, the indicative mode. See I., 2. Abbreviated indicative

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. (usually followed by `of') pointing out or revealing clearly
  • adj. relating to the mood of verbs that is used simple in declarative statements
  • n. a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact

Etymologies

From Latin indicativus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • Yes - so delicate - there's another!

    March 14, 2008

  • This word really gets me somehow. I love the way it sounds, and enunciating those two hard syllables in the middle always feels a little exciting and dangerous for me, like it is in danger of falling apart at the junction of those two syllables.

    March 14, 2008