Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Sliced fruit baked with sugar and spices in a deep dish, with a thick top crust.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pudding of spiced, sliced apples (or other fruit), sugar and butter, baked with a crumble topping in a deep dish

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A deep pie or pudding made of baked apples, or of sliced bread and apples baked together, with no bottom crust.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A pudding made of bread and apples baked together, usually cooked with molasses.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. deep-dish apple dessert covered with a rich crust

Etymologies

Perhaps from obsolete dialectal pandoulde, custard : pan1 + dialectal dowl, to mix dough in a hurry (probably variant of dough).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • For example, in general when the difference is a biscuit doughbaked on the top of the fruit (cobbler) vs. the biscuit topping being baked on top of the stove (grunt/slump), or, is the biscuit crumbled and pushed down into the fruit or on the bottom of the pan (pandowdy), we foundthe language was universal and have not received any notifications of disagreement as of yet.

    Rustic Fruit Desserts

  • They came with names like buckle and grunt, crumble and cobbler and crisp, brown Betty, sonker, slump, and pandowdy.

    Handle with Care

  • For example, in general when the difference is a biscuit doughbaked on the top of the fruit (cobbler) vs. the biscuit topping being baked on top of the stove ( grunt/slump),or, is the biscuit crumbled and pushed down into the fruit or on the bottom of the pan (pandowdy), we foundthe language was universal and have not received any notifications of disagreement as of yet.

    Rustic Fruit Desserts

  • First thing was an apple pandowdy, so named for its frumpy look.

    Archive 2006-09-01

  • Your favorites will depend on your personal taste preferences and you might call your dish a crisp, crumble, cobbler, grunt, slump, betty or a pandowdy.

    Classic Apple Pie | Baking Bites

  • Rabbit, trying to bond with his sister over a favorite memory, mention apple pandowdy, but she can't recall what he is talking about.

    Archive 2005-12-01

  • They have a recipe for apple pandowdy which makes me think of the last of Updike's Rabbit books.

    Archive 2005-12-01

  • After laying out the wet clothes to dry in the sunshine, Rebecca built a fire and then baked biscuits and an apple pandowdy.

    The Frasers Clay

  • 'Let me see,' replied Ann. 'It's some time since I eat anything, and I feel pretty hungry: if you will get me a plateful of pandowdy [8] and some ginger snaps, I shall feel thankful.'

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 1 January 1863 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • He gazed with bewilderment at the list of dinner dishes tended him; bear's meat, he felt, canvas back duck or terrapin, was not a diet proper to seven; but he solved the perplexity by ordering snipe, rolled and sugared cakes filled with whipped cream and preserved strawberries, and a deep apple pandowdy.

    The Three Black Pennys A Novel

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Comments

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  • “A spoon pie, with fruit on the bottom and a rolled crust on top, which is broken up to allow the juices to come through”

    Ochef.com, Cobbler, Crisp, Crumble, Grunt, Slump—You Get the Picture

    April 6, 2010

  • See also the entry
    "History and Legends of
    Cobbler, Crisps, Crumble, Brown Betty, Buckle, Grunts, Slumps, Bird's Nest Pudding, Sonker, & Pandowdy" on that same whatscookingamerica.net site.

    July 19, 2009

  • Pandowdy - It is a deep-dish dessert that can be made with a variety of fruit, but is most commonly made with apples sweetened with molasses or brown sugar. The topping is a crumbly type of biscuit except the crust is broken up during baking and pushed down into the fruit to allow the juices to come through. Sometimes the crust is on the bottom and the desert is inverted before serving. The exact origin of the name Pandowdy is unknown, but it is thought to refer to the deserts plain or dowdy appearance.
    _Whatscookingamerica.net/History

    February 6, 2008