Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To beat; pummel.
  • n. The upper front part of a saddle; a saddlebow.
  • n. Either of the two rounded handles on top of a pommel horse.
  • n. A knob on the hilt of a sword or similar weapon.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The upper front brow of a saddle.
  • n. Either of the rounded handles on a pommel horse.
  • n. The knob on the hilt of an edged weapon such as a sword.
  • v. To pound or beat.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The knob on the hilt of a sword.
  • n. The knob or protuberant part of a saddlebow.
  • n. The top (of the head).
  • n. A knob forming the finial of a turret or pavilion.
  • transitive v. To beat soundly, as with the pommel of a sword, or with something knoblike; hence, to beat with the fists.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To beat as with a pommel or with something thick or bulky; beat, as with the fists; bruise.
  • n. A knob or ball, or anything of similar shape.
  • n. The protuberant part of a saddle-bow.
  • n. The top (of the head).
  • n. A round knob on the frame of a chair.
  • n. A ballshaped ornament used as a finial to the conical or domeshaped roof of a turret, pavilion, etc.
  • n. In a ceremonial mace, the lower or butt end; in the case of a crowned mace, the end opposite the crown.
  • n. A piece of hard wood, grooved like a crimping-board, and attached to the hand by means of a strap, used in giving a granular appearance to leather and in making it supple.
  • n. The bat used in the game of nur-and-spell.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an ornament in the shape of a ball on the hilt of a sword or dagger
  • n. handgrip formed by the raised front part of a saddle
  • n. a handgrip that a gymnast uses when performing exercises on a pommel horse
  • v. strike, usually with the fist

Etymologies

From Middle English pomel, a pommel, from Old French, diminutive of pom, ball, fruit, from Latin pōmum, fruit.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English pomel, from Middle French, presumedly via Vulgar Latin pomellum ("ball, knob"), the diminutive of Late Latin pomum ("apple") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Alexander Artemev, a world bronze-medal winner in pommel horse, even struggled on the event, which probably cost him an Olympic berth.

    Hamm and Horton selected to Olympic gymnastics squad

  • Led Team USA to a victory over Canada earlier this year, taking first in pommel horse, still rings and parallel bars.

    Meet the USA Gymnastics team

  • Trevor stood beside something that vaguely resembled the gym apparatus known as a pommel-horse, holding an object like a cross between a large hot water bottle and an elephant's trunk, he referred to as an "AV."

    Chrome Circle

  • In modern side-saddles, the right-hand crutel of the pommel is made very small; but there is a third crutel added behind, nominally for assistance in leaping, but which is very useful in enabling a lady to keep her proper position in the saddle.

    The Lady's Country Companion: or, How to Enjoy a Country Life Rationally

  • Trevor stood beside something that vaguely resembled the gym apparatus known as a pommel-horse, holding an object like a cross between a large hot water bottle and an elephant's trunk, he referred to as an "AV.

    The Chrome Borne

  • The pommel was a lion head of bronze, the hilt leather-bound, the blade sharp and true.

    Shield of Thunder

  • Set into the pommel was a lustrous star sapphire, as big as a mans clenched fist.

    Dragons Of A Lost Star

  • He struck with the sword pommel, turned, and cut a pair of liches across at midchest with a single sweeping motion.

    Lord of the Isles

  • He then brained the rider with his sword pommel and ran him through with a quick thrust as he tried to rise.

    And Other Tales Of Valdemar

  • The pommel was a silver-washed iron apple, and the quillions were double, set at right angles to each other.

    Conan the Valiant

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Comments

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  • In fencing, the nut below the grip that holds the sword together and provides counterweight for balance.

    February 6, 2007