Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A heavily embroidered or jeweled garment formerly worn over the chest and stomach, especially by women.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who stomachs.
  • n. An ornamental covering for the breast, worn originally both by men and women. Those worn by women were often richly decorated.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who stomachs, in any sense of the word.
  • n. A stomachic; an appetizer.
  • n. A part of the dress covering the front of the body, generally forming the lower part of the bodice in front and usually projecting down into the skirt or lapping over it—the name being given to the whole front piece covering the pit of the stomach and the breast.
  • n. A plaque or brooch, usually large, the name being derived from that part of the dress upon which the brooch was worn.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. garment consisting of a V-shaped panel of stiff material worn over the chest and stomach in the 16th century

Etymologies

Apparently from stomach +‎ -er, perhaps after Middle French estomachier. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “And I,” said the youngest, “shall have my usual petticoat; but then, to make amends for that, I will put on my gold-flowered manteau, and my diamond stomacher, which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world.”

    The Blue Fairy Book

  • "And I," said the youngest, "shall have my usual petticoat; but then, to make amends for that, I will put on my gold-flowered manteau and my diamond stomacher, which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world."

    Cinderella; or, The Little Glass Slipper and Other Stories

  • "And I," said the younger, "shall wear my usual skirt; but then, to make amends for that, I will put on my gold-flowered mantle, and my diamond stomacher, which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world."

    Types of Children's Literature

  • I don’t pretend that I like wearing an old underskirt, and I hope to make dear Papa sensible of this; but against it I shall have the gold-flowered robe, on which I am determined, and my diamond stomacher, which is somewhat better than the common.

    Cinderella or the little Glass Slipper.

  • "And I," said the youngest, "shall only have my usual petticoat; but then, to make amends for that, I will put on my gold flowered manteau and my diamond stomacher, which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world."

    Children's Literature A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes

  • (I think this garment is called a stomacher, but I am not sure, as I have never liked to ask.)

    Diary of a Pilgrimage

  • "And I," said the youngest, "shall have my usual petticoat; but then, to make amends for that, I will put on my gold-flowered manteau, and my diamond stomacher, which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world."

    Blue Fairy Book

  • And that center front piece in the bodice? that's a "stomacher".

    Diegogarcity, Fake Bolero Edition - A Dress A Day

  • (Oxford English Dictionary) [37.2] A stomacher was a part of a woman's dress and was "a long ornate panel forming the front of an open low-necked bodice.

    Inventory of Robert Carter's Estate, November [1733]

  • There are Good Things to Try: (yes, more Sewing Seekrits)Stretch some clear elastic on the underside and stitch in place; this way, at least the neckline doesn't gape and let your treasures escape and hit passersby in the eye;Do the same trick with stretch lace;Fill in the neckline with a couple of rows of non-stretch lace down each side, filling in toward the center;File in the neckline with a lace insert;Wear a camisole;File in the neckline with a little dickey (aka "stomacher") that you've made to coordinate out of that really pretty trim you don't know what to do with, and velcro, snap, or hook-and-eye it in place (this is for those of us who get too warm to wear another full layer underneath, most of the time).

    Tiers of Joy - A Dress A Day

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • In the eighteenth century, a decorative piece for the center front of a woman's bodice. Did not always "match" the dress (and was not always intended to).

    August 26, 2008

  • "Her hands passing slowly over her trinketed stomacher.'
    Joyce, Ulysses, 15

    January 28, 2007