Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of twisting or turning.
  • n. The condition of being twisted or turned.
  • n. The stress or deformation caused when one end of an object is twisted in one direction and the other end is held motionless or twisted in the opposite direction.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
  • n. That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
  • n. That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act or effect of twisting; a forcible strain of a solid body by which parallel planes are turned relatively to one another round an axis perpendicular to them.
  • n. A wringing or wrenching, as of pain; a griping; tormina.
  • n. In surgery, the twisting of the cut end of a small artery in a wound or after an operation, for the purpose of checking hemorrhage.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a tortuous and twisted shape or position
  • n. a twisting force

Etymologies

Middle English torcion, wringing pain in the bowels, from Old French torsion, from Late Latin torsiō, torsiōn-, a wringing pain, variant of Latin tortiō, from tortus, past particple of torquēre, to twist; see torsade.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French, from Late Latin torsio, from Latin torqueō ("twist, turn"). See torture, -tort. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Twisting of the testicles, called torsion, can damage them and lead to antisperm antibody production.

    A Baby at Last!

  • Dr. Gregory Cochran, the first author on the Utah team's paper and a physicist who took up biology, said he became interested in the subject upon learning that patients with a particular Ashkenazic disease known as torsion dystonia were told by their physicians that "the positive thing is that this makes you smart."

    Archive 2005-06-05

  • The problem stems from the fact that the symptoms of mumps most especially swelling of the testicles can overlap with those caused by mononucleosis and a testicle problem called torsion.

    Getting Pregnant

  • Possibilities include testicular torsion, which is incredibly painful and must be dealt with immediately.

    reddit.com: what's new online!

  • His study, published in 1970 in the medical journal Lancet, compared IQs of 14 children with a Jewish disease called torsion dystonia -- a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable muscle contractions that twist the body -- along with 10 of their healthy siblings, and unrelated Jewish students matched by age, sex and school.

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • Siobhan said: hes going to be fine after he got jumped on by a 3 year old child A spiral fracture (also called a torsion fracture) is a bone ...

    The Dreamin' Demon

  • To guard against the influence of air currents, the apparatus (called a torsion balance) was enclosed in a room and observed with telescopes mounted on each side.

    doggdot.us

  • Another trend, growing from Weyl's work, involved introducing various geo - metrical features, such as torsion, directly into space - time, a notable example being the theory, based on an unsymmetric gab, on which Einstein was working at the time of his death.

    RELATIVITY

  • Quartz fibres have two great advantages over other forms of suspension when employed for any kind of torsion balance, from an ordinary more or less "astatic" galvanometer to the Cavendish apparatus.

    On Laboratory Arts

  • "torsion" types are more recommended than "extension" ones, because the former allows balancing and reduces friction between cables and springs on tracks.

    LifeSpy

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Comments

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  • "...the many, many cases of gross surfeit that have now replaced the frostbites, torsions and debility of the recent past..."
    --Patrick O'Brian, Blue at the Mizzen, 177

    March 27, 2008