Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An instrument, such as a barometer, designed to indicate changes in atmospheric conditions.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An instrument to indicate the state of the atmosphere, especially changes of atmospheric pressure, and hence changes of weather, such as a barometer or baroscope.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An instrument to indicate the state of the atmosphere, especially changes of atmospheric pressure, and hence changes of weather, as a barometer or baroscope.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An instrument dessigned to indicate the state of the atmosphere.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a simple barometer for indicating changes in atmospheric pressure

Etymologies

weather +‎ glass (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The still air was being stirred now by a strangely warm wind and every look at the weatherglass confirmed that the mercury shrank inside its four-foot tube.

    Sharpe's Siege

  • Madame Fosco was alone in the hall looking at the weatherglass.

    The Woman in White

  • If a bed-ridden meteorologist is told that it rains, he may or he may not receive the fact from the force of testimony; but he will certainly be more prëdisposed to receive it, if he finds that his weatherglass is falling rather than rising.

    The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper

  • A novel is like a weatherglass, -- where the man appears out at one time, the woman at another.

    Paul Clifford — Volume 06

  • And out toward the old Ice House (now the Art Barn) are the rocks with the best view of the pounding surf and small clots of scarlet pimpernel tucked in, operating as the "poor man's weatherglass".

    UUpdates - All updates

  • As the weatherglass of economy, stock market rise bears internal regular rules.

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  • Lord M. and I met with considerable feeling on both sides, and all our feuds were forgotten and forgiven; I conclude so at least, because one or two people, whom I know to be sharp observers of the weatherglass on occasion of such squalls, have been earnest with me to meet Lord M. at parties -- which I am well assured they would not have been (had I been

    The Journal of Sir Walter Scott From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford

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