Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sleeveless outer garment fastened at the throat and worn hanging over the shoulders.
  • n. A brightly colored cloth used in maneuvering the bull in a bullfight; a capote or muleta.
  • transitive v. To maneuver (the bull) by means of a cape in a bullfight.
  • n. A point or head of land projecting into a body of water.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into a sea or lake; a promontory; a headland.
  • n. A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders, but not reaching below the hips.
  • v. To head or point; to keep a course.
  • v. To gape.
  • v. To skin an animal, particularly a deer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland.
  • intransitive v. To head or point; to keep a course.
  • n. A sleeveless garment or part of a garment, hanging from the neck over the back, arms, and shoulders, but not reaching below the hips. See cloak.
  • intransitive v. To gape.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A circular covering for the shoulders and adjacent parts, either separate or attached to the top of a garment, as that of a gown or an overcoat.
  • n. A short circular garment hanging from the shoulders, worn for protection against the weather.
  • n. The coping of a wall.
  • n. plural Ears of corn broken off in thrashing.
  • n. A piece of land jutting into a sea or a lake beyond the adjoining coast-line.
  • n. [capitalized] A wine resembling sherry or canary, from the Cape of Good Hope.
  • Nautical, to keep a course; head or point: as, how does she cape?
  • n. In England, a judicial writ, now abolished, used in proceedings by the king or a feudal lord to recover land on the default of a tenant: called cape from its initial word.
  • To gaze; gape.
  • n. A Cape diamond.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shorter
  • n. a strip of land projecting into a body of water

Etymologies

Middle English cape, partly variant of cope, cope; see cope2, and partly from Anglo-Norman cape (from Medieval Latin cāpa, variant of Late Latin cappa).
Middle English cap, from Old French, from Old Provençal, from Latin caput, head.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle French cap, from Latin caput ("head"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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