Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To have sexual intercourse with.
  • intransitive verb To take advantage of, betray, or cheat; victimize.
  • intransitive verb Used in the imperative as a signal of angry dismissal.
  • intransitive verb To engage in sexual intercourse.
  • intransitive verb To act wastefully or foolishly.
  • intransitive verb To tinker or meddle with something. Often used with with.
  • intransitive verb To tease or treat someone carelessly or indifferently. Often used with with.
  • noun An act of sexual intercourse.
  • noun A partner in sexual intercourse.
  • noun A despised person.
  • noun Used as an intensive.
  • interjection Used to express extreme displeasure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun vulgar slang A slang term for sexual intercourse.
  • verb vulgar slang to have sexual intercourse (with).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb vulgar, colloquial To have sexual intercourse, to copulate.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To insert one’s penis, a dildo or other phallic object, into a specified orifice or cleft.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To put in an extremely difficult or impossible situation.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To break; to destroy.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To defraud.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To play with; to tinker.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial, often derogatory Used to express great displeasure with someone or something.
  • verb vulgar, colloquial To lose care for, to forget, to disregard, to no longer regard as important.
  • noun vulgar, colloquial An act of sexual intercourse.
  • noun vulgar, colloquial A sexual partner, especially a casual one.
  • noun vulgar, colloquial A highly contemptible person.
  • noun A thing of no value, a small amount.
  • interjection vulgar, colloquial Expressing dismay or discontent.
  • adverb Used as an intensifier for the words "yes" and "no".

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun slang for sexual intercourse
  • verb have sexual intercourse with

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English (attested in pseudo-Latin fuccant, (they) fuck, deciphered from gxddbov), probably akin to Dutch fokken, to strike, have sexual intercourse with, breed (cattle), German ficken, to have sexual intercourse with, and Swedish dialectal fock, penis; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Undetermined, but probably from Middle English *fucken, *fukken, of North Germanic origin, related to dialectal Norwegian fukka ("to copulate; fuck"), Swedish fokka (earlier "to fuck; thrust; push", nowadays focka ("to fire from work")), Swedish fock ("penis"), and Middle Dutch (and Modern Dutch) fokken ("to breed"). It may go back to the Proto-Indo-European *pug-, *puǵ- ("to strike"; source of Latin pūgnus ("fist") among many others), or to Proto-Indo-European *puḱn-, *pewḱ- ("to sting, stick, stab"; compare German ficken ("to fuck")). The word may be attested in an 772 CE charter which mentions a place called Fuccerham, which possibly means “ham of the fucker” or “hamm ("pasture") of the fucker”. The first verifiable use of the word in English writing appears in Flen flyys and freris, a medieval poem (1495–1505) containing the pseudo-Latin form fvccant; first listed in a dictionary in 1598. Appeared in Scots as fuck, fuk in 16th century sources, the earliest being the 1503 poem “Brash of Wowing” by William Dunbar, which includes the lines: “Yit be his feirris he wald haif fukkit: / Ye brek my hairt, my bony ane.”

Examples

  • Even though I was a freshman in high school, I had never heard anyone say the word fuck in a movie before.

    I'm Perfect, You're Doomed

  • When I was littleabout seven, I guessI remember getting in the car with my mother when she picked me up from school and telling her that Id seen the word fuck written on the handball court at the playground and I wanted to know what it meant.

    Wishful Drinking

  • When I was littleabout seven, I guessI remember getting in the car with my mother when she picked me up from school and telling her that Id seen the word fuck written on the handball court at the playground and I wanted to know what it meant.

    Wishful Drinking

  • When I was littleabout seven, I guessI remember getting in the car with my mother when she picked me up from school and telling her that Id seen the word fuck written on the handball court at the playground and I wanted to know what it meant.

    Wishful Drinking

  • The word fuck suggests suction and/or and/or flatulence.

    The Worst Years of Your Life

  • FUCK*: Adding the word fuck among friends can help any insult.

    How To Be Funny

  • FUCK*: Adding the word fuck among friends can help any insult.

    How To Be Funny

  • FUCK*: Adding the word fuck among friends can help any insult.

    How To Be Funny

  • FUCK*: Adding the word fuck among friends can help any insult.

    How To Be Funny

  • FUCK*: Adding the word fuck among friends can help any insult.

    How To Be Funny

Comments

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  • Celebrity lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower's comprehensive book "The F-word" is worth a read. Good book, but by the thousandth variation, the f-bomb loses some of it's power.

    December 2, 2006

  • Is there anything it CAN'T mean?

    December 2, 2006

  • ..when you need stronger words to comfort you on the waves of life. I believe strong words can not harm you - or anyone else - if your heart is pure and you understand, that the f-word is only a tool to get you through a heck of a moment. To me swear words and the like are some sort of an instant verbal gratification. I use the f-word fluently. In Finland it's a v-word. Sounds much worse in Finnish. Trust me, I know.

    June 24, 2007

  • Word History: The obscenity fuck is a very old word and has been considered shocking from the first, though it is seen in print much more often now than in the past. Its first known occurrence, in code because of its unacceptability, is in a poem composed in a mixture of Latin and English sometime before 1500. The poem, which satirizes the Carmelite friars of Cambridge, England, takes its title, "Flen flyys," from the first words of its opening line, "Flen, flyys, and freris," that is, "fleas, flies, and friars." The line that contains fuck reads "Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk." The Latin words "Non sunt in coeli, quia," mean "they (the friars) are not in heaven, since." The code "gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk" is easily broken by simply substituting the preceding letter in the alphabet, keeping in mind differences in the alphabet and in spelling between then and now: i was then used for both i and j; v was used for both u and v; and vv was used for w. This yields "fvccant (a fake Latin form) vvivys of heli." The whole thus reads in translation: "They are not in heaven because they fuck wives of Ely (a town near Cambridge)."

    Aside: FUCK did not start out life as the acronym: For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge.

    September 15, 2007

  • I've seen some crazy etymologies, but this one surpasses them all, sheer awesomeness.

    September 18, 2007

  • I just read a fantastic article in The New Republic that has a lot to do with this word. Here, read it, it's good.

    October 12, 2007

  • You're right. That is good. Thanks for the link!

    October 12, 2007

  • Bad Words, Overused, Can Lose Their Sting (New York Times, 05/16/08):

    The most surprising thing about Sue Simmons’s unbleeped blooper the other night is that anyone in this city even noticed.

    You may have read about her unfortunate slip. Ms. Simmons, a news anchor on WNBC-TV, tried to get the attention of her longtime partner, Chuck Scarborough, by asking him, “What are you doing?�?

    Only she did not realize that they were live on the air. And she didn’t quite say “What are you doing?�? She inserted two words between “what�? and “are.�? One of those words was “the.�? Sorry to be coy about the other one, but it is not allowed to be printed here. Rules are rules. If you can’t figure out what it is, you have not been in New York very long — like less than four minutes.

    Despite a certain amount of twitter over this incident, it seems that both the republic and Ms. Simmons will survive. “She’ll continue to be on the air,�? said a WNBC spokeswoman, Susan Kiel.

    The reality is that this vulgar word has been tossed about with such abandon in public for so many years that New Yorkers tend to tune it out. Its endless, and mindless, repetition left them numb long ago. By now, the word is no longer shocking, just tedious.

    May 16, 2008

  • Good article, Lampbane. My favorite paragraph:

    "Rarely do any of these people display a glimmer of the creativity shown by a fellow soldier in my Army days. The jeep he was driving broke down. Looking under the hood, he needed only four words to pronounce the vehicle beyond repair. The first was 'the,' followed by the Simmons-Cheney-Spitzer word in its adjectival, noun and verb forms--in that order. It bordered on poetry."

    May 16, 2008

  • Is it weird, Reesetee, that I immediately given only "the" and 3 f-words I guessed exactly the precise form the soldier used?

    May 19, 2008