Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Smartly or boldly stylish; dashing: a gallant feathered hat; cut a gallant figure at the coronation.
  • adj. Unflinching in battle or action; valiant: put up a gallant resistance to the attackers.
  • adj. Nobly or selflessly resolute: made a gallant attempt to save his friend's reputation.
  • adj. Stately; majestic.
  • adj. Courteously attentive especially to women; chivalrous.
  • adj. Flirtatious; amorous.
  • n. A fashionable young man.
  • n. A man courteously attentive to women.
  • n. A woman's lover; a paramour.
  • transitive v. To woo or pay court to (a lady).
  • intransitive v. To play the gallant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Brave, valiant.
  • adj. Honorable.
  • adj. Grand, noble.
  • adj. Very polite with women.
  • n. Fashionable young man, who is polite and attentive to women.
  • n. One who woos, a lover, a suitor, a seducer.
  • n. An animal or thing of grey colour, such as a horse, badger, or salmon.
  • n. topgallant
  • v. To attend or wait on (a lady).
  • v. To handle with grace or in a modish manner.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Showy; splendid; magnificent; gay; well-dressed.
  • adj. Noble in bearing or spirit; brave; high-spirited; courageous; heroic; magnanimous
  • adj. Polite and attentive to ladies; courteous to women; chivalrous.
  • n. A man of mettle or spirit; a gay, fashionable man; a young blood.
  • n. One fond of paying attention to ladies.
  • n. One who wooes; a lover; a suitor; in a bad sense, a seducer.
  • transitive v. To attend or wait on, as a lady.
  • transitive v. To handle with grace or in a modish manner.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Gay; fine; splendid; magnificent; showy as regards dress, ornamentation, or any external decorative effect.
  • Brave; high-spirited; heroic: as, a gallant officer.
  • Honorable; magnanimous; chivalrous; noble: as, a gallant antagonist.
  • (Also ga-lant′ .) In later use, courtly; polite; attentive to women; inclined to courtship; in a bad sense, amorous; erotic.
  • Synonyms Magnificent, brilliant.
  • Valiant, Courageous, etc. (see brave); bold, high-spirited, manful.
  • n. A gay, dashing person (rarely applied to a woman); a courtly or fashionable man.
  • n. An ardent, intrepid youth; a daring spirit; a man of mettle.
  • n. (Also ga-lant′ .) A man who is particularly attentive to women; one who habitually escorts or attends upon women; a ladies' man.
  • n. A wooer; a suitor; in a bad sense, a rake; a libertine.
  • n. Nautical, any flag carried at the mizzenmast.
  • To make gallant or fine; deck out.
  • To handle with grace or in a modish manner.
  • To play the gallant toward (a woman); attend or escort with deferential courtesy: as, to gallant a lady to the theater.
  • To make love; be gallant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. lively and spirited
  • adj. unflinching in battle or action
  • n. a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance
  • adj. having or displaying great dignity or nobility
  • adj. being attentive to women like an ideal knight
  • n. a man who attends or escorts a woman

Etymologies

Middle English galaunt, from Old French galant, present participle of galer, to rejoice, of Germanic origin; see wel-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French galant ("courteous, dashing"), present participle of galer ("make merry"), thought to be from Frankish *wala- (“good, well”), from Proto-Germanic *wal-. (Wiktionary)
From French (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He goes on from splendor to splendor, makes peculiarly his own the title "gallant," and on a March day in '63, shouting "Forward!" and smiling at troopers in a charge, he falls from his horse with a fatal wound.

    LEE’S LIEUTENANTS

  • Mademoiselle Sophie appeared to be highly interested, and kept looking at me while her brother was speaking, and, although she did not join in the praises her mother lavished upon me for what she called my gallant conduct, evidently regarded me as a hero.

    Paddy Finn

  • "She didn't tell you to go that way," Max pointed out, in gallant defense of the demoiselle.

    French Word-A-Day:

  • I don't like the tag of gallant losers but it was a magnificent effort.

    Blackburn Rovers 4-3 Newcastle United (aet) | Carling Cup match report

  • In the West, I heard almost no word of the war -- inter-collegiate sports were far more interesting and important, the only sympathy for Canada was pity for her loss in gallant sons and in treasure-the United States had no reason to enter the war, for no gun yet invented could carry a shell from the sea to the Mississippi.

    The United States and the League of Nations

  • I resolved, therefore, to carry the village, which I soon did in gallant style with H. M.'s 50th and a detachment of the Honourable Company's 1st European Light Infantry under Captain Seaton and Lieutenant —.

    The Autobiography of Liuetenant-General Sir Harry Smith, Baronet of Aliwal on the Sutlej, G. C. B.

  • All the while their horses covered the ground in gallant form.

    Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest

  • It was not the bull, it was a young Prince such as our pretty Princess, who was not without her day-dreams, like other young girls, had sometimes pictured to herself as coming on a splendid horse, with his followers around him in gallant attire, to ask her of her parents.

    The Tapestry Room: A Child's Romance

  • Then, before the smoke has had time to clear off, up comes the Bagstones in gallant form; whereupon the dahabeeyahs blaze away again as before.

    A Thousand Miles Up the Nile

  • The dictionary makers derive the word gallant from all sorts of roots in divers languages, meaning gay, brave, festive, proud, lascivious, and so on.

    Primitive Love and Love-Stories

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Dunno. But I have this:

    "Alice Spring Police arrested a 21-year-old man in Stott Terrace early Saturday morning. Police apprehended the man's Chrysler Gallant about 2.25am. He was charged with exceed .08 per cent after he was found to be driving with a blood alcohol content of .103 per cent. He was also charged with unlicensed driving and driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle. He was bailed to appear in the Alice Springs Magistrates Court today."
    - Northern Territory Police website, 12 May 2003.

    January 2, 2008

  • I thought the car name was spelled "Galant." Am I wrong? Signed, Too Lazy to Google and Find Out.

    January 2, 2008

  • The annoying thing about this as a car name was that the maker (Chrysler) insisted on the pronunciation being 'gal-LANT'.

    January 2, 2008