Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Characterized by or inclined to neglect, especially habitually.
  • adj. Characterized by careless ease or informality; casual.
  • adj. Law Guilty of negligence.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Careless, without appropriate or sufficient attention.
  • adj. Culpable due to negligence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Apt to neglect; customarily neglectful; characterized by negligence; careless; heedless; culpably careless; showing lack of attention.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Characterized by negligence or by neglectful habits; neglectful; careless; heedless; apt or accustomed to omit what ought to be done, or to do it in a careless or heedless manner: followed by of when the object of the negligence is specified: as, a negligent man; a man negligent of his duties.
  • Indicative of easy indifference or of disregard of conventionalities.
  • Synonyms Negligent, Neglectful, Remiss, Heedless, Thoughtless. inattentive, regardless, indifferent, slack. Of the first five words, remiss is the weakest; it especially applies to failure to attend to what is considered duty. Negligent is generally applied to inattention to things, neglectful to inattention to persons. Neglectful, by derivation, is stronger than negligent, but the difference is really small. Heedless, thoughtless, etc., indicate lack of heed, care, attention, thought, etc., where they are needed or due. All these words may apply to a particular occasion of failure, or indicate a habit or a trait of character; as, he is very heedless. See neglect, v., and negligence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. characterized by neglect and undue lack of concern

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin neglegēns, neglegent-, present participle of neglegere, to neglect; see neglect.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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