Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A bass singer, especially an operatic bass.
  • n. An instrumental part written for a bass instrument.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bass singer, especially in opera.
  • n. An instrumental part written for a bass instrument.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The bass or lowest part.
  • n. One who sings the lowest part.
  • n. The double bass, or contrabasso.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In music, the Italian word for bass.
  • n. One who sings bass.
  • n. An obsolete form of bashaw.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an adult male singer with the lowest voice
  • n. the lowest adult male singing voice

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Italian, from Medieval Latin bassus, low.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Italian, from Latin bassus ("short, low").

Examples

  • Mr. LISLEVAND: Well, this is all music based on what we call basso spinato (ph), obstinate (ph) basses.

    Rolf Lislevand, Improvising with 'Nuove Musiche'

  • Ludovico Grossi, called Viadana from the place of his birth, seems to have been the first to use the term basso continuo and on the authority of Prætorius and other writers was long credited with the invention of the thing itself.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • These types of roles, and their singers, were eventually called basso buffo, and few composers were better at writing these parts than Donizetti also provided a generous number of hilarious examples.

    News

  • Deep, rich and sonorous, it was the kind of basso profundo that ricocheted around the tile walls with stunning clarity, like the Whispering Gallery atop St. Paul's Cathedral.

    push butt

  • "Deep, rich and sonorous, it was the kind of basso profundo that ricocheted around the tile walls with stunning clarity, like the Whispering Gallery atop St. Paul's Cathedral." has to be the most eloquent writing on the topic I have ever read.

    push butt

  • She’s done some interesting BL under the penname basso (no caps – trés avant-guarde); perhaps if these two do well someone will pick up Amato Amaro or Orso e Intellettuale.

    Peeking at IKKI

  • "pictures" would probably be called basso-relievos.

    Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

  • There is the continuous shake, handed on from instrument to instrument, the slashing figure of the upper strings, the kind of basso ostinato, conventionally indicating the galloping of horses, and the chief melody, a mere bugle-call, altered by a change of rhythm into a thing of superb strength.

    Richard Wagner

  • In two or three of the apartments, were rudely-carved and clumsy figures of shields, in a kind of basso-relievo on the painted wainscoat; and over several of the chimney-pieces were arched niches, in which were crosses, old Romish bishops with their crosiers; — friars, some headless, some armless, with mutilated rosaries.

    Romance Readers and Romance Writers: a Satirical Novel

  • Outside my window it's tranquil, quiet, only the hum of tires on the highway over yonder as a kind of basso continuo, the occasional bird song I can't identify [I'm no John Clare, you know].

    Latest entries from endlesslyrocking.blog-city.com

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