Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A blitzkrieg.
  • n. A heavy aerial bombardment.
  • n. An intense campaign: a media blitz focused on young voters.
  • n. Football A sudden charge upon the quarterback by one or more of the linebackers or defensive backs when the ball is snapped. Also called red-dog.
  • transitive v. To subject to a blitz.
  • transitive v. Football To rush (the quarterback) in a blitz.
  • intransitive v. Football To carry out a blitz.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A sudden attack, especially an air raid; usually with reference to The Blitz.
  • n. A sudden effort, as a publicity blitz.
  • n. action of a defensive football player who rushes the passer of the football.
  • n. Blitz chess, a form of chess with a short time limit for moves.
  • n. A swift and overwhelming attack.
  • v. To attack.
  • v. To rush the passer.
  • v. To purée or chop (food products) using a food processor or blender.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a quick move by defensive players toward the passer on the offensive team, as soon as the ball is snapped; -- it is used when the defensive teams assumes that a pass will be attempted, and risks allowing substantial gains by the offensive team if other plays are in fact planned.
  • n. a rapid and violent military attack with intensive aerial bombardment. Same as blitzkrieg
  • n. any vigorous and intensive attack, bombardment, or assault, literally or figuratively; ; the German blitz on London.
  • n. same as blitz chess.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (American football) defensive players try to break through the offensive line
  • n. a swift and violent military offensive with intensive aerial bombardment
  • v. attack suddenly and without warning

Etymologies

Short for blitzkrieg.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Shortened from Blitzkrieg. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the decades since the Blitz, the term "blitz" and "blitzkrieg" have become neologisms, commonly used in a number of contexts, from advertising to law enforcement operations to sports, to describe a combination of overwhelming force and speed.

    NYT > Home Page

  • However, during the special session, the governor resurrected the idea — and despite another reported lobbying blitz from the industry (threatening swing district Democrats that money was going to pour into GOP coffers) — the tax — two cents per 12 ounce can of soda — passed.

    The Democrats Were Not Kidding About the Lobbying Barrage « PubliCola

  • The double A-gap blitz is used throughout the league now, but it was authored in Philadelphia by Johnson, and McDermott still leans on it heavily.

    Eagles' blitz is a certainty; stopping it is not

  • Clinton Portis is second to none among running backs in blitz pick-up, but the nine-year veteran is sidelined at least four to six weeks because of a third-degree groin tear.

    Packers' blitz will be a challenge for Torain and company

  • Once the initial PR blitz is done and it's time to pony up money for the clean up and compensation to affected businesses, the stalling and finger pointing will begin in ernest.

    BP, subcontractors: Spill is the other guy's fault

  • And I can't wait to hear the blitz from the Fringeright about the Obama's "Media Road Block" this Sunday.

    Networks respond to false Fox ad

  • Crushing up a bag of potato chips and throwing it overboard, so the birds start diving, and other boats think the blitz is on ... naughty.

    Naughty and Nice: A Flyfisher's Checklist

  • But the Law Times reports that his current media blitz is part of a recent (subsidized) strategy to improve his his image,

    2008 April : Law is Cool

  • The Wildcats like to use LB Braxton Kelley in blitz packages, but he might be needed more to double Tide WR Julio Jones.

    Weekend Preview: Loaded Big 12 kicks off conference play

  • But people like me who see it for what it is are disgusted by this and I can tell you, I don't care if this is just some kind of last-minute desperation blitz from the Clinton campaign - it's sickening and I will never offer her the slightest support because of this.

    NY Times slams Clinton's 'negativity'

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