Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A group of objects held together, as by tying or wrapping.
  • n. Something wrapped or tied up for carrying; a package.
  • n. Biology A cluster or strand of closely bound muscle or nerve fibers.
  • n. Botany A vascular bundle.
  • n. Informal A large amount; a lot: had a bundle of fun at the dance.
  • n. Informal A large sum of money: made a bundle selling real estate.
  • transitive v. To tie, wrap, or gather together.
  • transitive v. To dispatch or dispense of quickly and with little fuss; hustle: bundled the child off to school.
  • transitive v. To dress (a person) warmly: bundled them up in winter clothes.
  • intransitive v. To hurry; hasten: The children came bundling in from outside.
  • intransitive v. To dress oneself warmly.
  • intransitive v. To sleep in the same bed while fully clothed, a custom formerly practiced by engaged couples in New England and in Wales.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A group of objects held together by wrapping or tying.
  • n. A package wrapped or tied up for carrying.
  • n. A cluster of closely bound muscle or nerve fibres.
  • n. A large amount, especially of money.
  • n. A directory containing related resources such as source code; application bundle.
  • v. To tie or wrap together.
  • v. To hustle; to dispatch something or someone quickly.
  • v. To prepare for departure; to set off in a hurry or without ceremony.
  • v. To dress someone warmly.
  • v. To dress warmly. Usually bundle up
  • v. To sell hardware and software as a single product.
  • v. To hurry.
  • v. To dogpile
  • v. To hastily or clumsily push, put, carry or otherwise send something into a particular place.
  • v. To sleep on the same bed without undressing.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A number of things bound together, as by a cord or envelope, into a mass or package convenient for handling or conveyance; a loose package; a roll.
  • intransitive v. To prepare for departure; to set off in a hurry or without ceremony.
  • intransitive v. To sleep on the same bed without undressing; -- applied to the custom of a man and woman, especially lovers, thus sleeping.
  • transitive v. To tie or bind in a bundle or roll.
  • transitive v. To send off abruptly or without ceremony.
  • transitive v. to sell together as a single item at one inclusive price; -- usually done for related products which work or are used together.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To tie or bind in a bundle or roll: often followed by up: as, to bundle up clothes.
  • To place or dispose of in a hurried, unceremonious manner.
  • To depart in a hurry or unceremoniously: often with off.
  • In New England (in early times) and in Wales, to sleep in the same bed without undressing: applied to the custom of men and women, especially sweethearts, thus sleeping.
  • n. A number of things bound together; anything bound or rolled into a convenient form for conveyance or handling; a package; a roll: as, a bundle of lace; a bundle of hay.
  • n. Hence A group or a number of things having some common characteristic which leads to their being held and transferred in the same ownership.
  • n. In botany, a fascicular aggregation of one or more elementary tissues traversing other tissues.
  • n. In paper-making, two reams of printing-paper or brown paper: established by a statute of George I.
  • n. In spinning, twenty hanks or 6,000 yards of linen yarn.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a package of several things tied together for carrying or storing
  • v. compress into a wad
  • n. a large sum of money (especially as pay or profit)
  • n. a collection of things wrapped or boxed together
  • v. make into a bundle
  • v. sleep fully clothed in the same bed with one's betrothed
  • v. gather or cause to gather into a cluster

Etymologies

Middle English bundel, probably from Middle Dutch bondel; see bhendh- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle Dutch bondel or Old English byndele. Compare bindle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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