Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Law One who serves as a member of a jury.
  • n. Law One who awaits or is called for service on a jury.
  • n. One who serves on a deliberative body analogous to a jury.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a member of a jury

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A member of a jury; a juryman.
  • n. A member of any jury for awarding prizes, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who takes or has taken an oath; one who swears; an oath-taker. Compare nonjuror.
  • n. One who serves on a jury; a juryman; a person sworn to deliver the truth on the evidence given him concerning any matter in question or on trial.
  • n. The syndic of a gild or trade, elected by the members of a craft to act as arbiter between master and man, examine apprentices, initiate masters, and represent the body of them.
  • n. One of a body of men selected to adjudge prizes, etc., at a public exhibition or competition of any kind

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. someone who serves (or waits to be called to serve) on a jury

Etymologies

Middle English jurour, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin iūrātor, swearer, from iūrāre, to swear; see jury1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

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Comments

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  • No, it's because juror is a dumb word. See the "30 Rock" episode(s) where they make fun of one of the character's former projects, a film called "The Rural Juror." The running joke is that when anyone says the title, nobody can tell what the hell they're saying. :) (We still laugh about this, months later, in our house.)

    October 6, 2008

  • There was something on the TV news tonight about the (latest) OJ Simpson case. The American reporter managed to make this word sound like jurrr. Is it an errr of pronunciation?

    October 6, 2008