Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A plot of grass, usually tended or mowed, as one around a residence or in a park or estate.
  • n. A light cotton or linen fabric of very fine weave.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An open space between woods.
  • n. Ground (generally in front of or around a house) covered with grass kept closely mown.
  • n. A type of thin linen or cotton.
  • n. Pieces of this fabric, especially as used for the sleeves of a bishop.
  • n. A piece of clothing made from lawn.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An open space between woods.
  • n. Ground (generally in front of or around a house) covered with grass kept closely mown.
  • n. A very fine linen (or sometimes cotton) fabric with a rather open texture. Lawn is used for the sleeves of a bishop's official dress in the English Church, and, figuratively, stands for the office itself.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make into lawn; lay down in grass as a lawn.
  • n. Fine linen cambric, used for various purposes: also applied in the trade to various sheer muslins.
  • n. In ceramics, a fine sieve, generally of silk, through which slip for glazing is passed to bring it to uniform fineness and fluidity.
  • Made or consisting of lawn.
  • n. An open space in a forest or between or among woods; a glade.
  • n. An open space of ground of some size, covered with grass, and kept smoothly mown, as near a dwelling or in a pleasure-ground.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a field of cultivated and mowed grass

Etymologies

Alteration of Middle English launde, glade, from Old French, heath, pasture, wooded area.
Middle English laun, after Laon, a city of northern France.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Early Modern English laune ("turf, grassy area"), alteration of laund ("glade"), from Middle English launde, from Old French lande ("heath, moor") of Germanic or Gaulish origin, akin to Breton lann ("heath")"; Old Norse & Old English land (Wiktionary)
Apparently from Laon, a town in France known for its linen manufacturing. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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  • a type of linen: a sp_ce between woods

    March 26, 2009

  • An Ancient French loanword originally meaning "a clearing in the woods" (in Gaulish).

    January 31, 2008