Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See physical geography.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The subfield of geography that studies physical patterns and processes of the Earth. It aims to understand the forces that produce and change rocks, oceans, weather, and global flora and fauna patterns.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The science which treats of the earth's exterior physical features, climate, life, etc., and of the physical movements or changes on the earth's surface, as the currents of the atmosphere and ocean, the secular variations in heat, moisture, magnetism, etc.; physical geography.
  • n. The descriptive part of a natural science as distinguished from the explanatory or theoretic part.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A word of rather variable meaning, but, as most generally used, nearly or quite the equivalent of physical geography (which see, under physical). Also called geophysics.
  • n. [For the use of the word physiography by Huxley, as meaning a peculiar kind of physical geography, see the following quotation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the study of physical features of the earth's surface

Etymologies

physio- + -graphy (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The contrast in physiography, as we go northward, is less marked in Alberta and British Columbia.

    Canada Turning the Corner

  • Beginning with physiography (Green's name for natural history as the study of natura naturata), this scale proceeds to "physiology" or the study of the powers behind nature, the natura naturans that is the subject of German Naturphilosophie in the work of the early Schelling, Lorenz Oken and British thinkers such as John Hunter and John Abernethy.

    'The Abyss of the Past': Psychoanalysis in Schelling's Ages of the World (1815)

  • That description contains additional maps, as well as information on the physiography, geology, soil, potential natural vegetation, and the land use and land cover of the ecoregion.

    Ecoregions of New Mexico (EPA)

  • The physiography is generally a continuation of basin and range terrain that is typical of the Mojave Basin and Range (14) and the Central Basin and Range (13) ecoregions to the west and north, although the pattern of alternating mountains and valleys is not as pronounced as it is in Ecoregions 13 and 14.

    Ecoregions of New Mexico (EPA)

  • Nearly level to rolling till plains, lacustrine basins, outwash plains, and rolling to hilly moraines comprise the physiography of this region.

    Ecoregions of Wisconsin (EPA)

  • The physiography of the region is generally a continuation of basin and range terrain (excluding the Stockton Plateau) that is typical of the Mojave Basin and Range (14) and the Central Basin and Range (13) ecoregions to the west and north, although the pattern of alternating mountains and valleys is not as pronounced as it is in Ecoregions 13 and 14.

    Ecoregions of Texas (EPA)

  • The land is molded by tidal action, resulting in a distinctive physiography.

    Sundarbans, Bangladesh

  • Level II ecological regions are useful for national and subcontinental overviews of physiography, wildlife, and land use.

    Ecoregions of North America (CEC)

  • Overall, physiography and lithology contrast with the low mountains of the Northeastern Highlands (58), the Ridge and Valley (67), and the flat coastal plains of Ecoregions 63 and 84.

    Ecoregions of New Jersey (EPA)

  • Nearby ecoregions 62, 64, 67, and 84, including all other parts of New Jersey, lack metamorphic crystalline rock, as well as its associated physiography and soils.

    Ecoregions of New Jersey (EPA)

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