Comments by tbtabby

  • I have a book about how to perform an appendectomy, but someone tore out the last page.

    April 9, 2018

  • A very disturbing boss.

    March 16, 2018

  • A video game that proves VR is viable.

    March 13, 2018

  • Slang for a radio antenna.

    March 5, 2018

  • In radio, used to describe the radio personalities' work schedule. Radio clocks are timed to the minute, including station breaks, ads, and who is working when.

    March 5, 2018

  • A long commercial break, so called because it allows the DJ to stop working for a while.

    March 5, 2018

  • Also used to describe marking up a script to add pauses and inflections. One slash for a pause, two for a long pause, and an underline for emphasis. It's called "woodshedding" because the slashes are thought to resemble axe marks.

    March 5, 2018

  • Speaking sideways into a microphone to cut down on excessive popping and hissing.

    March 5, 2018

  • The area on the edge of town where all the TV and radio towers are built.

    March 5, 2018

  • A major radio station that's been given clearance by the FCC to be the only station with a particular frequency in a radius of up to 750 miles. Not to be confused with the media conglomerate of the same name.

    March 5, 2018

  • In radio, the point when a song's lyrics begin. A DJ whose banter ends right when the song's lyrics begin is said to have "hit the post."

    March 5, 2018

  • Music with no lyrics that a DJ can talk over, either to introduce a song or advertise something.

    March 5, 2018

  • A nationally-run radio commercial that has an empty spot in the middle where local affiliates can add their own specific commercials.

    March 5, 2018

  • A brief bit of music used for a transition on the radio.

    March 5, 2018

  • A large amount of radio feedback.

    March 5, 2018

  • "A semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith." -Biographia Literaria, 1817

    Coleridge coined the phrase later epitomized by the Mystery Science Theater 3000 theme song.

    March 5, 2018

  • "Ant tribes...that fold in their tiny flocks on the honeyed leaf, and the virgin sisters with the holy instincts of maternal love, detached and in selfless purity." -Moral and Religious Aphorisms, 1825

    Coleridge coined it 200 years after its opposite, selfish, was coined.

    March 5, 2018

  • "In order not to be miserable, you must have a Soul-mate as well as a House or a Yoke-mate." -An 1822 letter

    Being a Romantic poet, Coleridge needed a word to describe a profound and fated emotional connection.

    March 5, 2018

  • "The original Man, the Individual first created, was bi-sexual." -Aids to Reflection, 1824

    Coleridge was the first to use the word in print, but not in the same way it's used today. He used it to mean that humans are born with both masculine and feminine characteristics, and "learn" to act masculine or feminine. The word wasn't used to describe someone with attraction to either gender until the 1890s.

    March 5, 2018

  • "'Tis almost as bad as Lovell's 'Farmhouse,' and that would be at least a thousand fathoms deep in the dead sea of pessimism." -A letter from 1794

    Coleridge adapted this word from the French word pessimisme, which means "the worst."

    March 5, 2018

  • "Of course, I am glad to be able to correct my fears as far as public balls, concerts, and time-murder in narcissism." -an 1822 letter

    Coleridge was the first to use the Greek myth to describe real-world egomania.

    March 5, 2018

  • "But the will itself by confining and intensifying the attention may arbitrarily give vividness or distinctness to any object whatsoever." -Biographia Literaria, 1817

    Elsewhere in this book, Coleridge explains he invented this word because "render intense" didn't fit the meter of the poem he was trying to write.

    March 5, 2018

  • "To make our Feelings, with their vital warmth, actualize our Reason." -The Friend, 1809

    Betcha thought this was born out of late-20th-century corporate jargon, didn't ya? Nope. Coleridge verbed actual more than a century prior.

    March 5, 2018

  • "In any given perception there is something which has been communicated to it by an impact, or an impression." -Biographia Literaria, 1817

    The word had been used to describe a physical collision since the 1600s, but Coleridge was the first to use it in a metaphorical sense.

    March 5, 2018

  • I just encountered this word in a crostic puzzle. It was the first time I'd ever seen it used as an adjective. Why didn't they just use "Eighth month" as the clue?

    August 11, 2017

  • Mario's Word of the Week!

    May 9, 2017

  • A Welsh cheese made from goat's milk.

    January 21, 2017

  • I just learned this word from Animal Crossing: New Leaf. If you chat with a villager with a Normal-type personality (i. e. Dora) outside on a rainy day, they may say "Weather like this calls for making kugel later."

    April 20, 2016

  • California! California!

    September 22, 2015

  • Wrinkled, rumpled or creased.

    January 20, 2015

  • Hair.

    January 20, 2015

  • Used up.

    January 20, 2015

  • Nauseating.

    January 20, 2015

  • To flee in terror.

    January 20, 2015

  • Walking down the street while smoking a pipe.

    January 20, 2015

  • An angry rage.

    January 20, 2015

  • Practical joking, goofing off, or other nonsense.

    January 20, 2015

  • A man with a handsome face.

    January 20, 2015

  • Also means "tickle" in Swedish.

    December 1, 2013

  • If a boy with gold eyes and a metal staff asks if you are this, say "no."

    December 19, 2012

  • Granny Weatherwax is this for witches.

    December 4, 2012

  • Features in the shortest possible sentence that includes every letter of the alphabet: "Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz." Unless someone out there knows a shorter one.

    November 9, 2012

  • There's too many false ones flying around.

    September 27, 2012

  • Dew knot trussed yore spell chequer two fined awl miss takes.

    August 11, 2012

  • One of the achievements in Fist of the North Star: Ken's Rage is called "Fustigate Raoh."

    July 26, 2012

  • This word is certainly not in Granny Weatherwax's vocabulary.

    March 21, 2012

  • I hate it when people use this word when they mean conscience.

    March 8, 2012

  • I hate it when people use conscious when they mean this word.

    March 8, 2012

  • The most dangerous troll in Ankh-Morpork.

    February 8, 2012

  • A miserable pile of secrets.

    February 5, 2012

  • Learned this word watching World's Dumbest Criminals.

    February 1, 2012

  • A badass troll.

    January 28, 2012

  • This word was used in the 2003 Scrabble Championship tournament, which was featured on Cheap Seats. Jason mistook it for a misspelling of piranha.

    January 24, 2012

  • The waldo looks nervous.

    January 2, 2012

  • Like a bouncer, but more forceful.

    August 30, 2011

  • The most inglorious of all the game birds.

    August 15, 2011

  • A truce between destiny and reality. Coined by the Ultimate Warrior to describe a philosophy that makes sense to him alone.

    July 15, 2011

  • And now, in song!

    May 31, 2011

  • The UK spelling of tidbit.

    February 13, 2011

  • This word was made infamous my a hilariously bad horror film.

    February 1, 2011

  • Arsenic-based DNA discovered on Titan!

    December 3, 2010

  • The opposite of melodrama: Acting so low-key that it's impossible to tell what emotion the actor is supposed to be experiencing. Coined by The Distressed Watcher to describe the acting in the Twilight films.

    November 14, 2010

  • I'm a strictly cepivorous guy;

    I eat nothing but onions. No lie:

    Onion pies, onion cakes,

    Onion ice cream and shakes.

    Yes, I'm single…and think I know why.

    October 18, 2010

  • Means "snow" in Farsi.

    September 6, 2010

  • Means "cow" in Tagalog.

    July 29, 2010

  • Looks like a peapod to me.

    July 2, 2010

  • A tommygun.

    April 24, 2010

  • Notice, Shockofgod...the definition is not "madness."

    April 7, 2010

  • Pickled pigs' feet.

    February 8, 2010

  • Steak and bourbon...and a dog to eat the steak.

    February 8, 2010

  • A sandstorm.

    February 8, 2010

  • Toilet paper.

    February 8, 2010

  • A chamber pot.

    February 8, 2010

  • No paint at all.

    February 8, 2010

  • Coors beer.

    February 8, 2010

  • Sleeping on the ground without cover.

    February 8, 2010

  • A straw mattress.

    February 8, 2010

  • A mule.

    February 8, 2010

  • An armadillo.

    February 8, 2010

  • A '70s-style leisure outfit: Loud pants and shirt, white belt and loafers.

    February 8, 2010

  • Dice used for craps.

    February 8, 2010

  • A hangman's noose.

    February 8, 2010

  • A burro.

    February 8, 2010

  • A raccoon bone.

    February 8, 2010

  • Codfish.

    February 8, 2010

  • A straw mattress.

    February 8, 2010

  • Chewing tobacco.

    February 8, 2010

  • Baked beans.

    February 8, 2010

  • .

    February 8, 2010

  • Sturgeon. Originated in the 19th century, when the fish were extremely plentiful in the Hudson River.

    February 8, 2010

  • Cornbread.

    February 8, 2010

  • Cowhide.

    February 8, 2010

  • Pickled pigs' feet.

    February 8, 2010

  • Sympathy...but little else.

    February 8, 2010

  • A tommy gun.

    February 8, 2010

  • A wad of small-denomination bills with a large bill on the outside.

    February 8, 2010

  • Whiskey.

    February 8, 2010

  • Australian slang for a funny joke...which led to an Australian comedy festival being called the "Cracker Festival." Be careful wearing the promotional t-shirts.

    January 31, 2010

  • "...and Loopin was masticating to it!"

    January 29, 2010

  • "Eat to live, don't live to eat." -Cicero

    January 27, 2010

  • Stressing a normally weak beat.

    November 3, 2009

  • An acronym used for remembering the names of the Great Lakes: Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior.

    October 7, 2009

  • An egg-spitting hermaphrodite in Super Mario Bros. 2.

    September 9, 2009

  • A Secret Squirrel cartoon featured an evil, sentient quark as a villain. He was flattening the United States one structure at at time, destroying structures by pulling out the bottom atom. He planned to turn the country into a parking lot, then flatten Canada to make room for a giant amphitheater...where he would perform. The best part was the way he was defeated...Secret pointed out that quarks are defined as hypothetical particles, so he didn't really exist. Thus, he disappeared in a puff of logic.

    September 7, 2009

  • "Only the silky anteater?"

    September 5, 2009

  • Antony and Cleopatra, Act 2, Scene 5:

    "Half my Egypt were submerg'd and made / A cestern for scal'd snakes."

    September 2, 2009

  • Othello, Act 1, Scene 3:

    "I should but teach him how to tell my story, / And that would woo her. Upon this hint I spake."

    September 2, 2009

  • Shakespeare invented this word to mean "room or space within a bed."

    A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 2 Scene 2:

    "Then by your side no bed-room me deny."

    September 2, 2009

  • The game was well-known in Shakespeare's day, but he was the first to call it by its current name.

    Henry V, Act 5, Scene 2:

    "If I could win a lady at leapfrog...I should quickly leap into a wife."

    September 2, 2009

  • King John, Act 5, Scene 1:

    "Wild amazement hurries up and down / The little number of you doubtful friends."

    September 2, 2009

  • Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 4:

    "reason panders will."

    September 2, 2009

  • Shakespeare added the "in-."

    All's Well That Ends Well, Act 5, Scene 3:

    "We are old, and on our quick'st decrees / Th' inaudible and noiseless foot of time / Steals ere we can effect them."

    September 2, 2009

  • Shakespeare adapted this word into English from the Dutch verb "domineren."

    Love's Labor Lost, Act 3, Scene 1:

    "A domineering pedant o'er the boy."

    September 2, 2009

  • As You Like It, Act 2, Scene 7:

    "Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms."

    September 2, 2009

  • The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, Scene 2:

    "undress you, and come now to bed."

    September 2, 2009

  • The words eye and ball were already in the English language, but Shakespeare was the first to put them together.

    A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 3, Scene 2:

    "make his eyeballs roll with wonted sight."

    September 2, 2009

  • Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 2:

    "I have drugg'd their possets."

    September 2, 2009

  • Coriolanus, Act 4, Scene 1:

    "I go alone, / Like to a lonely dragon."

    September 2, 2009

  • Henry V, Act 4, Scene 1:

    "next day after dawn, / Doth rise and help Hyperion to his horse."

    September 2, 2009

  • Romeo & Juliet, Act 5, Scene 1:

    "in his needy shop a tortoise hung, / An alligator stuff'd, and other skins."

    September 2, 2009

  • You can turn any love song into a sea chantey by substituting "matey" for "baby."

    September 2, 2009

  • This was used in a question on 1 vs. 100:

    "Howard Stern is eating ratatouille with Baba Booey. What are they eating?

    A. A mixture of meats

    B. A variety of veggies

    C. A pastiche of pasta"

    The correct answer, of course, is B. But the contestant answered A. He's so sure, too...I feel bad for him. It's a commercial right now, but they're going to show him the answer when it comes back.

    EDIT: They showed it to him. I was right, it was painful to watch.

    August 30, 2009

  • The act of hiding a package in a public place, such as a park, for another agent to find.

    August 26, 2009

  • A double agent who's been caught and forced to feed misleading information to the enemy.

    August 26, 2009

  • In spy lingo, to cause an agent to become a double agent.

    August 26, 2009

  • Spy lingo for a meeting between an intelligence officer and a spy, in a time and place of the spy's choosing. Blind dates are very dangerous, because the spy could be setting a trap.

    August 26, 2009

  • Spy lingo for a male agent who uses the honey trap to entrap women into becoming spies. A spy gigolo, if you will.

    August 26, 2009

  • Someone who volunteers to be a spy by walking into a foreign embassy or similar post and volunteering their services.

    August 26, 2009

  • Passing information to or from a spy as you brush past them on a street or in a crowd. Also known as a "contact pass."

    August 26, 2009

  • Using sex to trap a spy, or blackmail someone into becoming a spy.

    August 26, 2009

  • The CIA. Also known as "The Company."

    August 26, 2009

  • In spy lingo, a talent spotter who hangs out in nightclubs, bars and other seedy places, looking for government employees who can be plied with booze, drugs, sex, or blackmail into becoming spies.

    August 26, 2009

  • Someone on the lookout for foreign nationals who might be recruited as spies.

    August 26, 2009

  • Spy lingo for a member of an enemy agency.

    August 26, 2009

  • The four most common reasons people turn against their nations and spy for a foreign power:

    Money

    Ideology

    Compromise (by incriminating information)

    Ego

    August 26, 2009

  • Spy lingo for a spy radio. The spy using it is called a pianist.

    August 26, 2009

  • Retrace the steps of a "blown" agent or operation in order to determine what went wrong.

    August 26, 2009

  • Russian term for spy operations that involve killing people. ("Wet" refers to blood.)

    August 26, 2009

  • Members of a surveillance team who ride as passengers in pursuit cars and follow suspects on foot when they leave their cars.

    August 26, 2009

  • The U.S. program of interviewing convicted spies in prison to learn their motives and prevent future spying.

    August 26, 2009

  • To make sudden U-turns or other driving maneuvers in order to spot, and hopefully lose, enemy agents who may be tailing you.

    August 26, 2009

  • Obscuring the true identity of individuals and equipment, so they can be sent on secret missions.

    August 26, 2009

  • A non-existent secret agent who is identified as a source of information in order to protect the real source.

    August 26, 2009

  • A suicide pill. The L stands for "lethal."

    August 26, 2009

  • Being chased by bloodhounds? Just drag this device behind you as you flee. It'll release a scent that throws them off your trail.

    August 26, 2009

  • A low-level employee, such as a waiter or bellhop, who occasionally freelances for a spy agency when needed.

    August 26, 2009

  • Sneaking into a home or office and searching it, leaving no evidence that you were there.

    August 26, 2009

  • Couldn't tell ya.

    August 26, 2009

  • Applause.

    August 26, 2009

  • In Hollywood, it's slang for a TV writer.

    August 26, 2009

  • A movie premiere.

    August 26, 2009

  • A songwriter.

    August 26, 2009

  • The advertising and publicity department of a movie studio.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for ABC.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for NBC.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for CBS.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for a TV network.

    August 26, 2009

  • A neighborhood theater.

    August 26, 2009

  • Not So Good.

    August 26, 2009

  • Network reruns sold into syndication.

    August 26, 2009

  • Very good, as in "socko b.o."

    August 26, 2009

  • Children's television.

    August 26, 2009

  • A dancer.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for movie or concert tickets.

    August 26, 2009

  • Pay TV.

    August 26, 2009

  • A sitcom aimed at teens.

    August 26, 2009

  • A record company.

    August 26, 2009

  • An awards show.

    August 26, 2009

  • Hollywood slang for a satellite.

    August 26, 2009

  • An agent.

    August 26, 2009

  • Audience.

    August 26, 2009

  • The Walt Disney Company.

    August 26, 2009

  • In entertainment industry slang, "to shoot a movie."

    August 26, 2009

  • Entertainment industry slang for the Walt Disney Company.

    August 26, 2009

  • In entertainment industry lingo: "To quit or be dismissed from a job, without necessarily specifying which."

    August 26, 2009

  • Morning.

    August 26, 2009

  • To promote something heavily.

    August 26, 2009

  • Acting performance.

    August 26, 2009

  • A film festival.

    August 26, 2009

  • In the entertainment industry, stands for "Box Office."

    August 26, 2009

  • In the entertainment industry, a movie that does well at the box office.

    August 26, 2009

  • Melodrama.

    August 26, 2009

  • Critics.

    August 26, 2009

  • The name of a town in Turkey.

    August 21, 2009

  • Also a Marvel Comics villain.

    August 19, 2009

  • Used in Dinosaur Comics.

    August 18, 2009

  • One of Strong Sad's favorite words, along with loquentia, imbruglia, precipitous, saralee, and cheesecake.

    August 3, 2009

  • Never mind...seems my source was wrong.

    August 3, 2009

  • Noun: A long, thin strip of fabric on the banner of a low-ranking knight used in the Middle Ages, cut off when he ascended to a higher rank. Thus, "getting one's schwenkel cut off" isn't nearly as painful as it sounds.

    August 3, 2009

  • It's an onomatopoeia in Japanese.

    July 15, 2009

  • She was very eristic.

    July 15, 2009

  • I love the Action Philosophers comic where Nietzsche beats the crap out of Hitler and Leopold & Loeb for perverting his philosophy.

    July 15, 2009

  • Means "dogs" in Scottish.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "paint" in Indonesian.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "water" in Indonesian.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "good" in Swedish.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "pearls" in Finnish.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "snout" in French.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "oven" in French.

    July 13, 2009

  • Means "discount" in Finnish.

    July 13, 2009

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