Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The state or process of boiling.
  • n. A sudden, violent outpouring, as of emotion: "did not . . . give way to any ebullitions of private grief” ( Thackeray).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the act of boiling
  • n. a sudden emotional outburst

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A boiling or bubbling up of a liquid; the motion produced in a liquid by its rapid conversion into vapor.
  • n. Effervescence occasioned by fermentation or by any other process which causes the liberation of a gas or an aëriform fluid, as in the mixture of an acid with a carbonated alkali.
  • n. A sudden burst or violent display; an outburst.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The bubbling up or agitation which results from the action of heat on a liquid, owing to the lowest portions becoming gaseous and escaping; a boiling up or over.
  • n. Any similar agitation, bubbling up, or disturbed or seething condition or appearance, produced by causes other than heat, as when rapidly flowing water encounters numerous obstacles or contrary currents.
  • n. Effervescence occasioned by fermentation or by any other process which causes the evolution of an aëriform fluid, as in the mixture of an acid with a carbonated alkali.
  • n. Figuratively, an outward display of feeling; a sudden burst; a pouring forth; an overflowing: as, an ebullition of passion.
  • n. Synonyms Ebullition, Effervescence, Fermentation. Ebullition is a boiling out or up; the word may be applied figuratively to that which suggests heated or intense activity. Effervescence is not the result of heat or of the escape of steam, but of the escape of gas from a liquid. Fermentation is a process often invisible, often taking place in solids, and sometimes producing effervescence in liquids.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an unrestrained expression of emotion

Etymologies

Middle English ebullitioun, from Late Latin ēbullītiō, ēbullītiōn-, from Latin ēbullītus, past participle of ēbullīre, to bubble up; see ebullient.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

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  • The old gentleman considered this trick as a mere ebullition of humour, a lawful stratagem of amorous warfare; and the jade of a go-between, with conscience still more callous than her master's, was delighted with the probability of the manoeuvre.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 9 ch. 6

    October 8, 2008