Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To gather grain left behind by reapers.
  • intransitive verb To gather (grain) left behind by reapers.
  • intransitive verb To collect bit by bit: synonym: reap.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To gather after a reaper, or on a reaped field; bring together from a scattered condition, as grain left after the removal of the main crop.
  • Hence To collect in scattered or fragmentary parcels or portions; pick up here and there; gather slowly and assiduously.
  • To gather stalks or ears of grain left by reapers; also, to collect or gather anything in a similar way.
  • noun The afterbirth, as of a cow or other domestic animal; the cleaning.
  • noun A handful of corntied together by a gleaner.
  • noun Anything gathered or gleaned.
  • noun A somewhat indefinite unit; a bunch: as, a glean of teazels. [Essex and Gloucestershire, Eng.] A glean of herrings, by a statute of Edward I., is 25.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To gather after a reaper; to collect in scattered or fragmentary parcels, as the grain left by a reaper, or grapes left after the gathering.
  • transitive verb To gather from (a field or vineyard) what is left.
  • transitive verb To collect with patient and minute labor; to pick out; to obtain.
  • intransitive verb To gather stalks or ears of grain left by reapers.
  • intransitive verb To pick up or gather anything by degrees.
  • noun obsolete Cleaning; afterbirth.
  • noun A collection made by gleaning.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To harvest grain left behind after the crop has been reaped.
  • verb To gather information in small amounts, with implied difficulty, bit by bit.
  • verb To frugally accumulate resources from low-yield contexts.
  • noun obsolete cleaning; afterbirth

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb gather, as of natural products

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English glenen, from Old French glener, from Late Latin glennāre, probably of Celtic origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English glenen, from Anglo-Norman glener, from Late Latin glen(n)ō ("make a collection"), from Gaulish.

Examples

  • So I forced myself to watch all the other Youtube clips of these two attractive archers, took a few notes on what I could glean from the clips and began Googling.

    Instructional Archery Babe Videos

  • Except from what you might glean from the certiorari petition, you have no real way of knowing the quality of the side you are supporting.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Kagan and Graham

  • I did an approximation of the focus/genre of the novels from what I could glean from the brief blurbs, and came up with this:

    Writer Unboxed » Blog Archive » Mendocino Conference fires up my interest in YA

  • So I forced myself to watch all the other Youtube clips of these two attractive archers, took a few notes on what I could glean from the clips and began Googling.

    Uncategorized Blog Posts

  • Except from what you might glean from the certiorari petition, you have no real way of knowing the quality of the side you are supporting.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Kagan and Graham

  • The law is about sales and distribution. it does not cover making your own at home and smoking them as far as i have been able to glean from the law.

    Boing Boing

  • In fact, in the real world, while the answers to the odd-numbered problems are not in the back of the textbook, the tests are all open book, and your success is inexorably determined by the lessons you glean from the free market.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • But from what I can glean from the decision, he showed more than a few signs of OCD.

    Follow-up: SCC tosses “dead fly” appeal : Law is Cool

  • As I glean from the Wikipedia article on the subject, atavistic traits are "birth defects" more than reactions to environmental changes.

    Eureka: What About Bob?

  • In fact, in the real world, while the answers to the odd-numbered problems are not in the back of the textbook, the tests are all open book, and your success is inexorably determined by the lessons you glean from the free market.

    La Profesora Abstraida

Comments

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  • An old English unit of quantity for herrings, equal to 25 fish.

    November 8, 2007