Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An element of ancient Greek theater.
  • n. Alternative form of skean. (a kind of dagger)

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See skean.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See skean.

Etymologies

From Ancient Greek σκηνή ("tent"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • So, in John 2:19-22, we appear to have this interpretation of Amos 9:11: 1. The “I” is Jesus as the pre-existent Logos 2. The skene tent/tabernacle is the body of Jesus 3. It is fallen in the sense that it has been slain by the Jews 4. It will be rebuilt in the sense that it will be restored to life—being, thereby, raised up from the dead—by Jesus as the Logos.

    Did Jesus Predict His Death? The Witness of Mark and John

  • What these two considerations suggest is that the primary scriptural passage upon which the “word” of Jesus is based regards not the raising of a naos (sanctuary) but, rather, the rebuilding of a skene (tent/tabernacle).

    Did Jesus Predict His Death? The Witness of Mark and John

  • The underlying thought appears to be that Jesus is a pre-existing divine being who became incarnate in the skene tent/tabernacle of David, i.e., in a fleshly body.

    Did Jesus Predict His Death? The Witness of Mark and John

  • In this case, in John 2:19-22, the interpretation of Amos 9:11-12 is this: 1. The Lord doing these things is Jesus and he is, as such, a pre-existent divine being “known from the ages” 2. The skene (tent/tabernacle) of David is the naos (temple) and this, in turn, is the body of Jesus 3. It is fallen in the sense that it has been “destroyed”, i.e., slain, by the Jews.

    Did Jesus Predict His Death? The Witness of Mark and John

  • That is to say, the Word, a pre-existent divine being, became incarnate in the skene tent/tabernacle of David, i.e., in a fleshly body.

    Did Jesus Predict His Death? The Witness of Mark and John

  • But in the dead of night, who should come in but James Desmond, sword in hand, with a dozen of his ruffians at his heels, each with his glib over his ugly face, and his skene in his hand.

    Westward Ho!

  • An hour had passed, when another Englishman was standing by the wailing girl, and round him a dozen shockheaded kernes, skene on thigh and javelin in hand, were tossing about their tawny rags, and adding their lamentations to those of the lonely watcher.

    Westward Ho!

  • Not a few people kept on eye on me as I made my way toward the skene.

    Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

  • For that matter, I thought, if the skene had not been padlocked, anyone offended by Nicias could have entered to take and return the sword.

    Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

  • From the middle double doorway of the skene, a group of fifteen men, dressed in long blue chitons with black stripes running from the shoulders to the hems of the flowing robes, emerged, swaying and walking slowly to the great circle below us.

    Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

Comments

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  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skene_(Drama)

    "In classical drama, the skene was the background building which connected the platform stage, in which costumes were stored and to which the periaktoi (painted panels serving as the background) were connected."

    March 14, 2010

  • Merriam-Webster link (above) takes you here:
    Etymology:
    Middle English skene, from Irish scian & Scottish Gaelic sgian, from Old Irish scían; probably akin to Sanskrit chyati he cuts off.

    I think sgian dubh or skean dhu are not usually capped though. (fwiw)

    August 26, 2008

  • Probably from Gaelic Sgian Dubh or Skean Dhu

    August 26, 2008

  • A knife, dagger, or small sword.

    August 26, 2008