Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Tending to rouse ill will, animosity, or resentment: invidious accusations.
  • adj. Containing or implying a slight; discriminatory: invidious distinctions.
  • adj. Envious.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. offensively or unfairly discriminating
  • adj. causing ill will towards the actor; causing offense.
  • adj. causing envy or ill will towards the possessor
  • adj. envious, jealous
  • adj. Hateful; odious; detestable

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Envious; malignant.
  • adj. Worthy of envy; desirable; enviable.
  • adj. Likely to or intended to incur or produce ill will, or to provoke envy or resentment; hateful; offensive.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Envious; causing or arising from envy.
  • Enviable; desirable.
  • Prompted by or expressing or adapted to excite envious dislike or ill will; offensively or unfairly discriminating: as, invidious distinctions or comparisons.
  • Hence Hateful; odious; detestable.
  • Synonyms Invidious, Offensive. Invidious, having lost its subjective sense of envious, now means producing or likely to produce ill feeling because bringing persons or their belongings into contrast with others in an unjust or mortifying way: as, an invidious comparison or distinction. The ill feeling thus produced would be not envy, but resentment, on account of wounded pride. Offensive is a general word, covering invidious and all other words characterizing that which gives offense.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. containing or implying a slight or showing prejudice

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

From Latin invidiōsus, envious, hostile, from invidia, envy; see envy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin invidiōsus, from invidia ("envy, ill will"), from in- ("upon") + videō ("I see").

Examples

  • And what you call invidious ghettos were great defences, they were havens, oases of peace and respect.

    Is religion a force for good... or would we be happier without God?

  • Clearly Dewey believed that political and economic conditions im modern societies encouraged an "alienation" from the aesthetic qualities of an "act of production," and to that extent Dewey's insistence that distinctions between fine and useful art are invidious is a politically-implicated gesture.

    John Dewey's *Art as Experience*

  • I do think the propensity of Americans to engage in invidious discrimination really has diminished, and diminished to the point of where much of the 1964 Act is unnecessary.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » So a Libertarian and a Liberal Walk into a Bar

  • Yet again invidious comparisons are made with our continental neighbours whose milk consumption, in part because of very different climatic conditions, is overwhelmingly of UHT milk.

    News from the Ministry for Daft Ideas

  • Alternatively, Congress should have more leeway to fashion remedies because the states are more likely to be engaging in invidious discrimination where laws or practices touching upon suspect classifications are concerned.

    Balkinization

  • This paper had been particularly disagreeable concerning the “dividend-cooking” system of certain of the Comstock mines, at the same time calling invidious attention to safer investments in California stocks.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • This paper had been particularly disagreeable concerning the "dividend-cooking" system of certain of the Comstock mines, at the same time calling invidious attention to safer investments in California stocks.

    Mark Twain, a Biography. Complete

  • "dividend-cooking" system of certain of the Comstock mines, at the same time calling invidious attention to safer investments in California stocks.

    Mark Twain, a Biography — Volume I, Part 1: 1835-1866

  • As Thorsten Veblen taught us with the notion of invidious comparison, in a product category where absolute quality is hard to measure—wines, coffee, supercars—people assume the more expensive item is somehow intrinsically better.

    Nissan GT-R: A 'Halo Car' With Devil's Horns

  • What one person calls natural preference another calls invidious, immoral, or bigotry.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Are “Ladies’ Nights” Discriminatory?

Comments

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  • "Humans are therefore faced with an invidious choice once they learn about Roko’s Basilisk: they can help to build the superintelligence, or face painful and unending perdition at the hands of a future, ultra-rational AI."

    Source: The most avid believers in artificial intelligence are aggressively secular – yet their language is eerily religious. Why?

    January 22, 2018

  • Bacon and Descartes' identification of logic with dialectic seems to have an intentionally invidious significance." - Great Ideas, p.798

    July 24, 2012

  • It has to be mal-uh-pro-phobia.

    July 11, 2007

  • Ha! An old joke that is new to me.

    July 10, 2007

  • Sounds like that old joke that asks why the word "lisp" has an "s" in it. ;-)

    July 10, 2007

  • Woah, how do you pronounce that? I'm afraid of saying it wrong. ;-)

    July 10, 2007

  • malaprophobia?

    July 10, 2007

  • It also carries the connotation of dyslexic speech. ;-)

    July 10, 2007

  • I agree, dyslogophobia is good. It sounds *real*.

    July 10, 2007

  • Ooh, I like u's suggestion better.

    July 10, 2007

  • Okay, maybe maldyslogophobia. But I would be afraid to say it. ;-)

    July 10, 2007

  • Malogophobia? ;->

    July 10, 2007

  • dyslogophobia? ;-)

    July 10, 2007

  • Because it reminds me of insidious, I am chary of using this word--fear of misspeaking.

    I need a word for "fear of misspeaking." Help me, Wordies!

    July 10, 2007