Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to chivalry.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. of, or relating to chivalry
  • adj. gallant and respectful, especially to women

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Relating to chivalry; knightly; chivalrous.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Partaking of the character of chivalry; chivalrous; knightly.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Ages

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Not only had the slaveholders perpetrated the preponderance of atrocities, and with impunity at that, but they had begun to boast that northerners and New Englanders were congenitally soft and altogether lacking in "chivalric" and soldierly qualities.

    The Man Who Ended Slavery

  • The slaveholders ... had begun to boast that northerners and New Englanders were congenitally soft and altogether lacking in "chivalric" and soldierly qualities.

    John Brown in The Atlantic

  • But there was a certain chivalric thrill of warm blood in him, despite his Yankee ancestry and New England upbringing, and he was so made that the commercial aspect of life often seemed meaningless and bore contradiction to his deeper impulses.

    WHERE THE TRAIL FORKS

  • To appease the tribal gods, Sipsu, the chief's daughter, is chosen to be sacrificed and while three of the four men chose not to interfere, one of them, named Hitchcock ( "there was a certain chivalric thrill of warm blood in him, despite his Yankee ancestry and New England upbringing"), determines that he will not to let Sipsu die.

    “Why this longing for life? It is a game which no man wins.”

  • But there was a certain chivalric thrill of warm blood in him, despite his Yankee ancestry and New

    Where the Trail Forks

  • She remembered -- she, then strong in her own untempted truth -- asking him, if he did not think that buying in the cheapest and selling in the dearest market proved some want of the transparent justice which is so intimately connected with the idea of truth: and she had used the word chivalric -- and her father had corrected her with the higher word, Christian; and so drawn the argument upon himself, while she sate silent by with a slight feeling of contempt.

    North and South

  • It was what I suppose would be called a chivalric look; and yet chivalry was only an improved barbarism.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 12, No. 31, October, 1873

  • Mr. Pneumonia was not what you would call a chivalric old gentleman.

    The Trimmed Lamp, and other Stories of the Four Million

  • Page 287 provoked Simon Burney to wrath; there was something astir within him that in a worthier subject might have been called a chivalric thrill, and it forbade him to hold his peace.

    In the Tennessee mountains,

  • But there is more of this 'chivalric' spirit in the same article.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

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