Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of a breed of heavyset dog originating in China, having a long, dense, reddish-brown or black coat and a blue-black tongue. Also called chow chow.
  • n. Food; victuals.
  • intransitive v. To eat: chowed down on the meat and potatoes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Food, especially snacks.
  • n. A Chinese breed of dog; the chow-chow.
  • n. A Chinese person.
  • v. To eat.
  • v. To (use a tile or tiles to) piece together a winning combination of tiles.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A prefecture or district of the second rank in China, or the chief city of such a district; -- often part of the name of a city, as in Foochow.
  • n. a breed of thick-coated medium-sized dogs with fluffy curled tails and distinctive blue-black tongues; -- same as chowchow{3}, n..

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To chew.
  • To grumble.
  • n. The jowl: used only in the phrase “cheek for chow” (that is, cheek by jowl).
  • n. A word forming part of the names of many places in China, indicating either a prefecture or district of the second rank or the chief city of such a district: thus, Ning-hai-chow may mean either the district of Ning-hai or the city of Ning-hai. Sometimes spelled chao, chau, and choo.
  • n. A unit of weight in Bombay, used for gold and silver, and equal to three tenths of a troy grain.
  • n. A unit of the nature of the square of a mass, used in the East Indies in the valuation of pearls. A Madras chow is 48 square grains troy, a Bombay chow 15.7 square grains.
  • n. A Chinaman. [Colloq., Australia.]

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. informal terms for a meal
  • n. breed of medium-sized dogs with a thick coat and fluffy curled tails and distinctive blue-black tongues; believed to have originated in northern China
  • n. the imperial dynasty of China from 1122 to 221 BC; notable for the rise of Confucianism and Taoism

Etymologies

Possibly of Chinese Pidgin English origin.
Possibly from Chinese (Cantonese) tsaāp, food, miscellany; see chop suey.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Shortened from chow-chow. (Wiktionary)
From Chinese. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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