Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state of being creative; creativity

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality of being creative.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The character or faculty of being creative or productive; originality.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the ability to create

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They would not have been able to form nations, to excel in creativeness and invention, to conquer outer space, and to declare Human Rights.

    Naguib Mahfouz - Nobel Lecture

  • What we call creativeness, even in the greatest artists, is but a fineness of sensibility and cognition, or rather recognition, coupled with the power to express what they see and feel in nature.

    Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592

  • The quality that is called creativeness in a writer is closely akin to lying, and in turn to what in children is called "imagination."

    The Private World of William Faulkner

  • The sea-shore, sea seen from shore, shore seen from sea; the taste of two metals in contact; and our enlarged powers at the approach and at the departure of a friend; the experience of poetic creativeness, which is not found in staying at home, nor yet in traveling, but in transitions from one to the other, which must therefore be adroitly managed to present as much transitional surface as possible; this command of two elements must explain the power and the charm of Plato.

    Representative Men

  • The sea-shore, sea seen from shore, shore seen from sea; the taste of two metals in contact; and our enlarged powers at the approach and at the departure of a friend; the experience of poetic creativeness, which is not found in staying at home, nor yet in travelling, but in transitions from one to the other, which must therefore be adroitly managed to present as much transitional surface as possible; this command of two elements must explain the power and the charm of

    Representative Man (1850)

  • The seashore, sea seen from shore, shore seen from sea; the taste of two metals in contact; and our enlarged powers at the approach and at the departure of a friend; the experience of poetic creativeness, which is not found in staying at home, nor yet in traveling, but in transitions from one to the other, which must therefore be adroitly managed to present as much transitional surface as possible; this command of two elements must explain the power and charm of Plato.

    Representative Men

  • At this source man is in possession of a power of a new kind of creativeness in any field of knowledge or life he may be obliged to work.

    An Interpretation of Rudolf Eucken's Philosophy

  • But he has treated art in precisely the same manner as he has treated all other important problems: he has shown that no great art is possible unless it is rooted in a creativeness which is _spiritual_.

    An Interpretation of Rudolf Eucken's Philosophy

  • The divine element in humanity has revealed itself in that instinct for creativeness which is always striving for expression in the work of humanity; that instinct which blindly pushes its way through rudimentary stages of effort to the possession of skill; slowly transforming itself meanwhile into intelligence, and flowering at last in the Parthenon, the Cathedral at

    Essays on Work and Culture

  • For example, 'creativeness' is a standard for 5-year-old children, but the requirement about the creativeness of children is different from the requirement for adults and doctors.

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