Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A protruding rim, edge, rib, or collar, as on a wheel or a pipe shaft, used to strengthen an object, hold it in place, or attach it to another object.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An external or internal rib or rim, used either to add strength or to hold something in place.
  • n. The projecting edge of a rigid or semi-rigid component.
  • n. An ability in a role-playing game which is not commonly available, overpowered or arbitrarily imposed by the referees.
  • n. A vulva.
  • n. The collective noun for a group of baboons.
  • v. To be bent into a flange.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An external or internal rib, or rim, for strength, as the flange of an iron beam; or for a guide, as the flange of a car wheel (see car wheel.); or for attachment to another object, as the flange on the end of a pipe, steam cylinder, etc.
  • n. A plate or ring to form a rim at the end of a pipe when fastened to the pipe.
  • intransitive v. To be bent into a flange.
  • transitive v. To make a flange on; to furnish with a flange.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To project out.
  • To be bent into a flange; take the form of a flange.
  • To furnish with a flange; make a flange on.
  • n. A projecting edge, rim, or rib on any object, as the rims by which cast-iron pipes are connected together, or the marginal projections on the tires of railroad-car wheels to keep them on the rails.
  • n. A strengthening rib: as, the flange of a fish-bellied rail or girder.
  • n. A plate placed over the end of a pipe or cylinder to close it partly or wholly.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a projection used for strength or for attaching to another object

Etymologies

Possibly variant of flanch, device at the side of an escutcheon, perhaps from French flanche, feminine of flanc, side; see flank.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
English dialect flange to project, flanch a projection. See flank. As a term for a group of baboons, first used in the comedy TV series Not the Nine O'Clock News. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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Comments

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  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • Your flange is very impressive

    January 24, 2008