Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Slang Mad; insane.
  • n. See locoweed.
  • n. See loco disease.
  • transitive v. To poison with locoweed.
  • transitive v. Slang To make insane; craze.
  • adv. Music At the pitch written. Used chiefly as a direction.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. crazy
  • adj. intoxicated by eating locoweed
  • n. certain species of Astragalus or Oxytropis, capable of causing locoism.
  • adv. A direction in written or printed music to return to the proper pitch after having played an octave higher or lower.
  • n. locomotive

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Insane; crazy.
  • adv. A direction in written or printed music to return to the proper pitch after having played an octave higher.
  • n. A plant (Astragalus Hornii) growing in the Southwestern United States, which is said to poison horses and cattle, first making them insane. The name is also given vaguely to several other species of the same genus. Called also loco weed.
  • n. Any one of various leguminous plants or weeds besides Astragalus, whose herbage is poisonous to cattle, as Spiesia Lambertii, syn. Oxytropis Lambertii.
  • n. A locomotive.
  • transitive v. To poison with loco; to affect with the loco disease; hence (Colloq.), to render insane or mad.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To poison with the loco-weed or crazy-weed.
  • Derived from loco-weed.
  • Hence To make crazy or in any way eccentric: as, he's plumb locoed.
  • n. Same as loco-weed.
  • n. A disease of animals resulting from eating loco-weeds.
  • n. An abbreviated form of locomotive.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. informal or slang terms for mentally irregular

Etymologies

Spanish, crazy, possibly from Arabic lawqā', foolish, feminine sing. of 'alwaq, from lāqa, to soften; see lwq in Semitic roots.
From Italian loco, from Latin locō, ablative of locus, place.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Italian (Wiktionary)
Spanish loco ("insane, crazy"), from loco ("loose"). From Ancient Greek γλαυκός ("clear") or Arabic لَوَق (láwaq, "foolishness"). (Wiktionary)
Abbreviation of locomotive. (Wiktionary)

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