Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
  • n. Scornful reproach or contempt: a term of opprobrium.
  • n. A cause of shame or disgrace.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
  • n. Scornful reproach or contempt
  • n. A cause of shame or disgrace.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A state of disgrace; infamy; reproach mingled with contempt; odium{3}.
  • n. Abusive language.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Imputation of shameful conduct; insulting reproach; contumely; scurrility.
  • n. Disgrace; infamy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. state of disgrace resulting from public abuse
  • n. a state of extreme dishonor

Etymologies

Latin, from opprobrāre, to reproach : ob-, against; see ob- + probum, reproach; see bher-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
First attested 1656, from Latin opprōbrium ("reproach, disgrace"), from opprōbrō ("reproach, taunt"), from ob ("against") + probrum ("disgrace, dishonor"). (Wiktionary)

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  • My anger has a causal relationship with the opprobrium resulting from the daily altercations with my neighbour

    July 21, 2013

  • Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
    Scornful reproach or contempt: a term of opprobrium.
    A cause of shame or disgrace.

    February 20, 2009

  • "The Actor's Opprobrium," The Sunlandic Twins Bonus EP

    November 22, 2007

  • "Some of the opprobrium and sense of embarrassment that would forever after attach itself to the comic book form was due to the way it at first inevitably suffered, event at its best, by comparison with the mannered splendor of Burne Hogarth, Alex Raymond, Hal Foster, and the other kings of funny page draftsmanship..."

    "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay", Michael Chabon, p75

    August 10, 2007