Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The state of being a vagrant.
  • n. The conduct or mode of existence of a vagrant.
  • n. The offense of being a vagrant.
  • n. A wandering in mind or thought.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the state of being a vagrant

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality or state of being a vagrant; a wandering without a settled home; an unsettled condition; vagabondism.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A state of wandering without a settled home: not necessarily in a bad sense.
  • n. The life and condition of a vagrant; in law, the name given to a very miscellaneous class of offenses against public police and order. See vagrant.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the state of wandering from place to place; having no permanent home or means of livelihood

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dear Mollie -- I was glad to know that bound with the fetters of Science, and depressed by thought, you were Struggling yet to ascend the rugged Steep -- where "Star eyed Science" and fame unfold their banners to every anxious aspirant, and under whose folds of magnitude and magnificence all alike are permitted to recumb, and recur those who have in vagrancy strayed "tracing Shadows" -- beware of

    Letter from Young John Allen to Mollie Houston,June 2, 1854

  • And meanwhile the quite obvious cause of vagrancy is staring one in the face.

    Down and Out in Paris and London

  • He then continues: "This experience reiterated the lesson that the vast majority of these wanderers are of the class with whom a life of vagrancy is a chosen means of living without work."

    The Tramp

  • Court of Miracles, a crutch metamorphosable into a club; it is called vagrancy; every sort of spectre, its dressers, have painted its face, it crawls and rears, the double gait of the reptile.

    Les Miserables

  • But how far could they go before they would be arrested for what the white people called vagrancy?

    Forty Acres and Maybe a Mule

  • The next three were called vagrancy: (1) Loafing on the docks; (2) "sleeping out" nights; (3) getting "wandering spells."

    The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets

  • It no longer walks, it hobbles; it limps on the crutch of the Court of Miracles, a crutch metamorphosable into a club; it is called vagrancy; every sort of spectre, its dressers, have painted its face, it crawls and rears, the double gait of the reptile.

    Les Miserables, Volume IV, Saint Denis

  • Such harassment takes the form of more or less prolonged detentions, or accusations which later serve as the basis for convicting the accused of crimes such as vagrancy and drug abuse.

    Tangled Nicaragua: An Exchange

  • Then, between 3 May and the end of the month, thousands of police, conducted large-scale raids all over the country to round up Africans suspected of 'vagrancy', contraventions of the pass laws, tax offences, and the like.

    Eliminating all Opposition

  • Our courts frown upon the practice of arresting persons on charges such as vagrancy in order to enable the police to question them upon some other offence which they are suspected of having committed.

    Is This Justice?

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