Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of emancipation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the summer of 2010, I had the great privilege of participating in a roundtable discussion in New York City, organized by the national nonprofit, Step Up Women's Network www.suwn.org and Bayer Healthcare to examine that most fundamental of female emancipations: reproductive freedom.

    Jane D. Wurwand: Do More, and Do It Now

  • In the summer of 2010, I had the great privilege of participating in a roundtable discussion in New York City, organized by the national nonprofit, Step Up Women's Network www.suwn.org and Bayer Healthcare to examine that most fundamental of female emancipations: reproductive freedom.

    Jane D. Wurwand: Do More, and Do It Now

  • They impress, they horrify, they break through the psychological shielding of readers to make people feel a passionate need to make things right -- even centuries after the various emancipations of African slaves, and abolitions of slavery in different nations.

    EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Gord Sellar

  • How many more emancipations, big and small, can we help achieve?

    Marty Favor: Waiting for the Word of Freedom

  • Can we really be radical – can this whole writing-through-our-lives thing be meaningful beyond our own little personal emancipations – if that ‘we’ is a collectivity that is defined by privilege?

    The Mom in the Mirror | Her Bad Mother

  • The right to vote, a 20th-century conquest, was only one delayed step in a series of legal emancipations, which created a new legal personality for women.24

    A History of American Law

  • By 1820, South Carolina cut off all emancipations except by will, and only as a reward for meritorious service.

    A History of American Law

  • The right to vote, a 20th-century conquest, was only one delayed step in a series of legal emancipations, which created a new legal personality for women.24

    A History of American Law

  • The right to vote, a 20th-century conquest, was only one delayed step in a series of legal emancipations, which created a new legal personality for women.24

    A History of American Law

  • By 1820, South Carolina cut off all emancipations except by will, and only as a reward for meritorious service.

    A History of American Law

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